Productivity

IT is the Foundation for Better Building

January 19, 2012
| Blogs & Op-eds

In a recap of a compelling ITIF event, Steve Norton reflects on the need to innovate in the construction industry. Construction is a physical undertaking of getting bricks, beams, pipes and glass to sites and putting them together but IT can help us better design, coordinate and revolutionize the process. When we start breaking new ground literally, we should also do so in our thinking and consider the economic footprint of a more productive and innovative construction sector.

Bricks and Bits: Transforming the Construction Industry Through Innovation

January 18, 2012 - 9:00am - 11:00am
National Press Club
529 14th Street Northwest
Holeman Lounge
Washington
DC
20045

Notwithstanding the current surplus in housing, over the next quarter century the U.S. will need to invest trillions of dollars in construction to meet the demands of a growing population and to refurbish aging infrastructure. Doing this efficiently will be critical to America’s economic future. Read more »

Bricks and Bits: Transforming the Construction Industry Through Innovation

January 18, 2012
With its vast holdings, the government has learned a thing or two about procurement and coordinating construction management and it plays a critical role in setting standards and undertaking industry-related R&D.

Notwithstanding the current surplus in housing, over the next quarter century the U.S. will need to invest trillions of dollars in construction to meet the demands of a growing population and to refurbish aging infrastructure. Doing this efficiently will be critical to America’s economic future. However, when benchmarked against America’s leading industries, the construction industry is anything but efficient. Indeed, measured growth in construction industry productivity has actually declined over the last two decades. Read more »

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Antiquated Economic Policies Are Killing Jobs More Than Robots Are

December 9, 2011
| Blogs & Op-eds

In an Op-Ed for The Huffington Post, ITIF President Rob Atkinson clarifies we should be worried about job creation but recognize that technology and machines are the solution, not the cause of our stubbornly-high unemployment rate. For that we can blame a tax code that does not encourage innovation and long-term investment, the lack of a national innovation and competitiveness strategy, passivity in the face of unfair or illegal trade practices, and a failure to invest in the talents of our workers and in new technologies. 

Rather than rail against the machine, pundits and policymakers would do better to embrace technology-led productivity, while at the same time do much more to help workers adjust to changes, including investing more to create a 21st century skills system and shoring up a unemployment safety net that is full of holes. Fundamentally, the machines are our friends.

Innovation and Productivity: What’s the Relationship and How Does it Happen?

November 11, 2011
| Presentations

In a featured presentation at the ATSE Forum, Rob Atkinson stresses the relationship between innovation and productivity. All nations need an innovation-productivity strategy because addressing complex and systemic challenges–such as achieving affordable health care, combating global climate change, achieving sustainable energy production, deploying digital infrastructure, etc.–requires coordinated strategies leveraging the resources of firms, government, academia. And, in contrast to what the conventional neo-classical economic doctrine holds, markets alone will produce societally sub-optimal levels of innovation.

Jobs that Build the Economy

October 26, 2011
| Presentations

ITIF president Rob Atkinson will present “How Advanced Manufacturing Drives Innovation and Wealth Creation in the United States" as part of the Jobs that Build the Economy conference. The conference will discuss how advanced manufacturing can grow our economy, maintain the quality of life for all Americans, and sustain a broad-based middle class. Topics will include: industry demand for skilled, U.S.-based employees; public and private elements of a national manufacturing agenda; the need for a multiple-pathway educational system including nationally portable, industry-recognized credentials; and the strategic value of market diversification and innovation.

Bill to Ban Sale of Alcohol through Self-Service Checkout Terminals Cloaked in Falsehood

August 17, 2011
| Blogs & Op-eds

ITIF Senior Analyst Daniel Castro explains in an op-ed California's proposed ban on self-service checkouts will impede innovation not underage drinking.

Technology and Automation Create, Not Destroy, Jobs

June 15, 2011
| Blogs & Op-eds

The productivity gains that technology and automation generate—including through self-service technologies such as ATMs, kiosks, and self-checkout machines—ultimately create jobs, not destroy them, as the President recently claimed.