http://www.itif.org/all_event/feed en Accelerating Sustainability: Maximizing the Benefits of Connected Cars http://www.itif.org/events/accelerating-sustainability-maximizing-benefits-connected-cars <div class="field field-type-text field-field-enablereg"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> off </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-ext-registration"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> http://www.eventbrite.com/e/accelerating-sustainability-maximizing-the-benefits-of-connected-cars-tickets-11285387899 </div> </div> </div> <p>The age of the intelligent vehicle is here. Every day new technologies are being announced that allow us to save time, fuel, and emissions when we travel. We are bringing experts together to identify and describe some of the most promising technologies on the market and discuss how government policy can extend their benefits to our communities and our planet. The first of two panels will be "Connected Cars are Cleaner Cars." Please join us for a great discussion!</p><p>Beverages and pastries will be served.*</p><p><em>Panel 1: Connected Cars are Cleaner Cars</em></p><p>Jason Harrison, Director, Emerging Enterprises and Partnerships, AT&amp;T&nbsp;</p><p>Leo McCloskey, Senior Vice President, Technical Programs, ITS America</p><p>Eric Berkobin, Vice President, Engineering, Verizon Telematics</p><p>Moderator: Matthew Stepp, Executive Director, Center for Clean Energy Innovation</p><p><em>Panel 2: Policy Drivers &amp; the Future of the Connected Car</em></p><p>Mary Brown, Director, Government Affairs, Cisco</p><p>Hilary Cain, Director, Tech and Innovation Policy, Toyota&nbsp;Catherine McCullough, Executive Director, Intelligent Car Coalition</p><p>Paul Feenstra, Senior Vice President for Government and External Affairs, ITS America</p><p>Jules Polonetsky, Executive Director and Co-Chair, Future of Privacy Coalition</p><p>Moderator: Dean Garfield, President &amp; CEO, Information Technology Industry Council</p><p><br />*This event is a widely attended event under House and Senate ethics rules and a widely attended gathering under executive branch rules.</p><div class="field field-type-computed field-field-rel-ids-issues"> <div class="field-label">Rel IDs for issues:</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 5542 </div> </div> </div> Energy & Climate Transportation Thu, 08 May 2014 13:00:00 +0000 akey 5542 at http://www.itif.org How Technology is Reshaping the Future of Mobility http://www.itif.org/events/how-technology-reshaping-future-mobility <div class="field field-type-text field-field-enablereg"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Enable Registration </div> </div> </div> <p>Transportation is undergoing a technological transformation. Even as companies compete to introduce new and more efficient fuel technologies, increasing consumer demand for connectivity is turning the vehicle into the next mobile platform. Changing demographics and consumer behavior have inspired new mobility models, such as car-sharing and ride-sharing. Cities are also becoming innovative, with smart parking and other intelligent transportation systems. In addition, groundbreaking active safety technologies are paving the way today for the automated vehicles of tomorrow. And, in the near future, cars will be communicating with each other and the infrastructure around them.&nbsp;</p> <p>Please join ITIF for an expert panel discussion about the future of mobility, the new technologies and business models that are likely to emerge, and the policies that can help spur even greater innovation. The event will also include a demonstration of Toyota’s new front-drive, zero emission, concept vehicle: the <a href="http://www.toyota-global.com/showroom/toyota_design/concept_cars/gallery_i-road.html">i-Road</a>. A raffle will be held at the close of the panel giving one lucky attendee a chance to drive the car.</p><div class="field field-type-computed field-field-rel-ids-issues"> <div class="field-label">Rel IDs for issues:</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 5470,5522 </div> </div> </div> Transportation Wed, 09 Apr 2014 18:00:00 +0000 akey 5470 at http://www.itif.org The Economic Impact of Open Data http://www.itif.org/events/economic-impact-open-data <div class="field field-type-text field-field-enablereg"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> off </div> </div> </div> <p>Government agencies collect a vast amount of data that is valuable not only to the agency that collected it, but also to many other stakeholders in the public and private sector. By making their data freely available without restrictions, government agencies can enable the private sector to leverage public data—including weather information, maps, legal filings, financial statements, health indicators, and education metrics—to develop new products and services and create new economic value. Already, a wide variety of companies have created innovations that were born from government data that has been made available for reuse.</p><p>Join the <a href="http://www.datainnovation.org/" target="_blank">Center for Data Innovation</a> for a panel discussion highlighting new findings about where demand for open data is strongest and how government agencies can help promote continued data-driven growth in these sectors. At the event, the GovLab at New York University will also officially release the <a href="http://www.opendata500.com/" target="_blank">Open Data 500</a>, the first comprehensive study of U.S. companies that use open government data as a key business resource, and will announce plans for a new program to improve the ways federal agencies and businesses can work together.</p><p>A live webcast will be featured on this <a href="http://www.datainnovation.org/2014/04/the-economic-impact-of-open-data/" target="_blank">page</a>.</p><div class="field field-type-computed field-field-rel-ids-issues"> <div class="field-label">Rel IDs for issues:</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 5499,5521 </div> </div> </div> Data Innovation Tue, 08 Apr 2014 15:30:00 +0000 akey 5499 at http://www.itif.org Bully or Bodyguard? Assessing the Proper Role of the United States in Internet Governance http://www.itif.org/events/bully-or-bodyguard-assessing-proper-role-united-states-internet-governance <div class="field field-type-text field-field-enablereg"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Enable Registration </div> </div> </div> <p>A <a href="http://www.icann.org/en/news/announcements/announcement-07oct13-en.htm" target="_blank">variety of organizations</a>, including the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the Internet Society (ISOC), the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), and the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), have demanded that the United States step down from its historic role in providing oversight of Internet governance. In addition, European Commission Vice President<a href="http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-14-142_en.htm" target="_blank"> Neelie Kroes</a> has called for Europe to begin “redrawing the global map of Internet governance,” and a <a href="http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=COM:2014:0072:FIN:EN:PDF" target="_blank">committee in the European Commission</a> announced its intentions to “establish a clear timeline for the globalization of ICANN.” In contrast, <a href="http://thehill.com/blogs/hillicon-valley/technology/197786-tech-fears-shadow-campaign-for-global-control-of-internet" target="_blank">others have speculated</a> that if the United States cedes its authority, other countries will begin manipulating the Internet's architecture for political purposes.<br><br>Should the U.S. government give in to these demands to relinquish its authority over the IANA function?&nbsp;If so, could the Administration act unilaterally, or does it need authority from Congress? And what would be the likely consequences to the long-term stability and security of the Internet? Finally, what is a feasible path forward for U.S. involvement in Internet governance?</p><p>The event is free, open to the public, and complies with ethics rules. A live webcast will be available on the day of the event on this page. Lunch will be provided.&nbsp;</p><div class="field field-type-computed field-field-rel-ids-issues"> <div class="field-label">Rel IDs for issues:</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 5419,5509 </div> </div> </div> Internet Thu, 03 Apr 2014 16:00:00 +0000 akey 5419 at http://www.itif.org The National Broadband Plan: Four Years Later http://www.itif.org/events/national-broadband-plan-four-years-later <div class="field field-type-text field-field-enablereg"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Enable Registration </div> </div> </div> <p>In March 2010, at the request of Congress, the Obama administration presented a strategy for expanding the availability and adoption of broadband Internet access nationwide. The National Broadband Plan included specific proposals to address "national purposes" through expanded broadband access, including job creation and economic growth, consumer welfare, civic participation, public safety and homeland security, health care, and energy independence and efficiency.&nbsp;</p><p>ITIF reunites the team from the Federal Communications Commission that spearheaded the development of recommendations to integrate broadband into key components of society and people's daily lives. The team provides an update on the plan's effectiveness in achieving these national purposes during what has already been an eventful year for Internet policy action and debate. Lunch will be provided.</p><p>The event is free, open to the public and complies with ethics rules. This event will be live webcast.<br> <br><br></p><div class="field field-type-computed field-field-rel-ids-issues"> <div class="field-label">Rel IDs for issues:</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 5386,5459 </div> </div> </div> Broadband Wed, 19 Mar 2014 16:00:00 +0000 akey 5386 at http://www.itif.org ITIF Debate: Is There a STEM Worker Shortage? http://www.itif.org/events/itif-debate-there-stem-worker-shortage <div class="field field-type-text field-field-enablereg"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Enable Registration </div> </div> </div> <p>The issue of high skill immigration is receiving increased attention as Congress considers comprehensive immigration legislation. Underlying this issue is an ongoing debate surrounding the U.S. labor market for high-skill workers, including those in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields. The key policy questions being discussed include: is there a shortage of STEM workers in the U.S. economy; is the U.S. education system producing enough STEM graduates with requisite STEM education; and does high-skill immigration negatively affect the domestic supply of STEM talent?</p> <p>ITIF will host a lively debate on this critical policy issue. Robert Atkinson, President of ITIF, and Jonathan Rothwell, an Associate Fellow at the Brookings Institution, will argue that the United States does face a STEM worker shortage, which is hampering the development of the innovation economy, and high-skill immigration should be used as a tool to address the skills gap. Hal Salzman, Professor of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University and Ron Hira, Associate Professor of Public Policy at Rochester Institute of Technology, will counter that the country is not experiencing a STEM shortage, and increased immigration will simply exacerbate unemployment and hurt U.S. workers.&nbsp;The debate will be moderated by Kevin Finneran, editor of the National Academies'&nbsp;<em>Issues in Science and Technology</em>.</p> <p>The event is free, open to the public and complies with ethics rules. This event will not be live streamed but a video recording will be available the day after the event.</p><p>Read <span style="text-decoration: underline;">"</span><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="http://www2.itif.org/2013-guestworkers-high-skill-labor-market.pdf" target="_blank">The Real Story on Guestworkers in the High-skill U.S. Labor Market</a>."</span></p><div id="_mcePaste" style="position: absolute; left: -10000px; top: 0px; width: 1px; height: 1px; overflow: hidden;"><a href="The Real Story on Guestworkers in the High-skill U.S. Labor Market" target="_blank">The Real Story on Guestworkers in&nbsp;</a></div><div id="_mcePaste" style="position: absolute; left: -10000px; top: 0px; width: 1px; height: 1px; overflow: hidden;"><a href="The Real Story on Guestworkers in the High-skill U.S. Labor Market" target="_blank">the High-skill U.S. Labor Market</a><a href="The Real Story on Guestworkers in the High-skill U.S. Labor Market" target="_blank">The Real Story on Guestworkers in&nbsp;the High-skill U.S. Labor Market.</a></div><div class="field field-type-computed field-field-rel-ids-issues"> <div class="field-label">Rel IDs for issues:</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 5355,5436 </div> </div> </div> Education & Training Science and R&D Wed, 12 Mar 2014 17:00:00 +0000 akey 5355 at http://www.itif.org Realizing the Promise of Telehealth http://www.itif.org/events/realizing-promise-telehealth <div class="field field-type-text field-field-enablereg"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Enable Registration </div> </div> </div> <p>An aging population and an expansion in health care coverage means that more Americans will be using health care services in the coming years. As new demands are placed on our national health care system, policymakers need to be actively working to leverage technology to lower costs, increase access, and improve quality of care. One important opportunity is to use telehealth technologies to easily connect doctors and patients through online encounters that are often on par with in-person ones, but with lower costs and greater convenience for doctors and patients. Unfortunately, while the technology to deliver these services is available today, adoption remains relatively low because of a variety of policy barriers. Join ITIF, along with Representatives Matsui (D-CA) and Johnson (R-OH)—co-sponsors of the Telehealth Modernization Act—to discuss how Congress can help overcome these barriers and expand the benefits of telehealth to all Americans.</p><div class="field field-type-computed field-field-rel-ids-issues"> <div class="field-label">Rel IDs for issues:</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 5373,5399 </div> </div> </div> Health IT Wed, 26 Feb 2014 20:00:00 +0000 akey 5373 at http://www.itif.org ITIF Debate: Congress Should Retain and Expand the R&D Tax Credit http://www.itif.org/events/itif-debate-congress-should-retain-and-expand-rd-tax-credit <div class="field field-type-text field-field-enablereg"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Enable Registration </div> </div> </div> <p>In 1981, the federal government established the research and experimentation (R&amp;D) tax credit. Today, with Congress considering comprehensive corporate tax reform some have argued that Congress should jettison the credit and use the savings to pay for statutory rate reduction. For example, in a recent <a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/everyones-talking-about-tax-reform-but-no-one-really-knows-what-it-would-do/2012/11/30/5882a7a0-3a73-11e2-8a97-363b0f9a0ab3_story.html">Washington Post op-ed</a>, noted tax economist Marty Sullivan, argued for elimination of the tax. In contrast,&nbsp;<a href="http://www2.itif.org/2012-eroding-foundation.pdf">ITIF has argued</a> that this would be a mistake and that the credit plays a valuable role in spurring investment in U.S. R&amp;D while also increasing jobs, innovation and competitiveness.</p><p>Please join ITIF for a spirited debate on the R&amp;D Tax Credit.</p> <p>The event is free, open to the public and complies with ethics rules.</p><div class="field field-type-computed field-field-rel-ids-issues"> <div class="field-label">Rel IDs for issues:</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 5313,5394 </div> </div> </div> Taxes Wed, 26 Feb 2014 14:00:00 +0000 akey 5313 at http://www.itif.org ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit http://www.itif.org/events/arpa-e-energy-innovation-summit <div class="field field-type-text field-field-enablereg"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> off </div> </div> </div> <p>ITIF is serving as a supporting partner for the 2014 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit. It is the premier event dedicated to transformative energy solutions. The Summit brings together academia, business, and government to discuss cutting-edge energy issues and facilitate relationships to help move new technologies into the marketplace.&nbsp;Use the discount code "ITIF", when registering.</p> <ul> <li>Experience first-hand the latest technology advancements&nbsp;&nbsp;</li> <li>Hear keynotes from industry leaders and luminaries&nbsp;&nbsp;</li> <li>Attend practical seminars on transitioning new technology into successful commercial products</li><li>Network with technology companies, government leaders, entrepreneurs and researchers who are ready to collaborate</li></ul><div class="field field-type-computed field-field-rel-ids-issues"> <div class="field-label">Rel IDs for issues:</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 5274 </div> </div> </div> Energy & Climate Mon, 24 Feb 2014 05:00:00 +0000 akey 5274 at http://www.itif.org The Value of Brands and Reputation in the Global Marketplace http://www.itif.org/events/value-brands-and-reputation-global-marketplace <div class="field field-type-text field-field-enablereg"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Enable Registration </div> </div> </div> <p>Everyone understands the value of business brands for consumers and sales, but the evidence on the economy-wide implications of branding is limited. For example, how much do companies invest in branding relative to other tangible and intangible assets? In which ways are there markets for brands? How do branding choices affect the functioning of market competition? Do branding activities affect the pace of product innovation? &nbsp;How does trademark policy affect brands?</p><p>To understand more about these critical issues ITIF is hosting a panel for the U.S. release of the World Intellectual Property Organization’s (WIPO) new 2013 World Intellectual Property Report: Brands-Reputation and Image in the Global Marketplace. &nbsp;</p><div class="field field-type-computed field-field-rel-ids-issues"> <div class="field-label">Rel IDs for issues:</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 5219,5367 </div> </div> </div> Intellectual Property Wed, 12 Feb 2014 14:00:00 +0000 akey 5219 at http://www.itif.org Enhancing University-Industry R&D Partnerships http://www.itif.org/events/enhancing-university-industry-rd-partnerships <div class="field field-type-text field-field-enablereg"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Enable Registration </div> </div> </div> <p>Post-World War II era U.S. science, technology, and innovation policy has been defined by a linear approach to public investment in basic research. For many decades, this worked because the U.S. was one of the few countries with the technological capabilities to translate research into new products and services. But in today’s intensely competitive global economy where nations are fiercely competing for innovation advantage, this paradigm is no longer tenable. Robust public investments in basic research remain critical, but equally as important are investments and institutional reforms to commercialize new ideas from the laboratory into the marketplace.&nbsp;</p> <p>To advance the debate on potential policy reforms, the House Technology Transfer Caucus, Co-Chairs Rep. Gus Bilirakis (R-FL) and Rep. Ben Ray Luján (D-NM), the Information Technology &amp; Innovation Foundation, and Innovation Associates are convening a series of Capitol Hill briefings featuring leading experts in innovation policy.</p> <p>The third and final event in this series will investigate avenues to strengthen University-Industry R&amp;D Partnerships. While the United States leads the world in transitioning university research into new products, services, and start-up companies vital to our economy, a significant share of university research continues to languish in academic laboratories rather than progress to commercial markets.&nbsp;Addressing roadblocks will be crucial to spurring innovation and economic development moving forward. This panel discussion will examine university-industry partnership best practices as well as potential policy issues, such as intellectual property, university invention management, and the federal role in university technology transfer.&nbsp;</p><div class="field field-type-computed field-field-rel-ids-issues"> <div class="field-label">Rel IDs for issues:</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 5136,5321 </div> </div> </div> Science and R&D Tue, 28 Jan 2014 14:00:00 +0000 akey 5136 at http://www.itif.org Leveraging Innovation Clusters to Accelerate Clean Energy Research Into Market http://www.itif.org/events/leveraging-innovation-clusters-accelerate-clean-energy-research-market <div class="field field-type-text field-field-enablereg"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> off </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-ext-registration"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07e8s62muf9a07e8c3&amp;oseq=&amp;c=&amp;ch </div> </div> </div> <p>Innovation and commercialization of new technologies is fundamental to long-term economic growth and job creation. Yet there are significant challenges to moving new clean technologies from the lab to the market, including business planning, market development, regulatory reform, and technology demonstration. The human and capital resources to address many of these challenges overlap where clean tech startups and energy markets aggregate– in regional clusters. The U.S. has a significant number of new, emerging innovation clusters and regional initiatives to accelerate early clean tech commercialization. These regional initiatives build partnerships or networks with National Labs, universities, states, non-profits, innovation accelerators, and private companies to help move innovations out of the lab and into the factory. In many cases, these partnerships have become true hubs of innovation in their respective state or region.</p> <p>The next step in developing and expanding these innovation clusters is two-fold: (1) connecting each to the broader federal R&amp;D ecosystem; and (2) leveraging best practices and seeding the development of new innovation clusters where opportunities exist. For instance, many clean tech ecosystems were created, in part, from public investments, such as through the Department of Energy’s Innovation Ecosystem program, the Department of Commerce’s i6 Green program, and the Small Business Administration’s Regional Innovation Cluster program. These programs have demonstrated that federal support can help grow innovation clusters around the country. It is critical to formally link federal energy R&amp;D resources and institutions to these innovation clusters to accelerate technology transfer, pilot testing, technology demonstration, and smart deployment of new ideas into the market.</p> <p>To highlight best innovation cluster practices and discuss potential policy reforms, the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation and the New England Clean Energy Council are bringing together leading regional clean tech innovation programs from across the country to discuss their efforts and potential for expanded impact. The session is also sponsored by the office of Senator Ed Markey (D-MA).</p><div class="field field-type-computed field-field-rel-ids-issues"> <div class="field-label">Rel IDs for issues:</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 5275 </div> </div> </div> Energy & Climate Thu, 23 Jan 2014 15:30:00 +0000 akey 5275 at http://www.itif.org Data Innovation Day 2014 http://www.itif.org/events/data-innovation-day-2014 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-enablereg"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> off </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-ext-registration"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> http://www.eventbrite.com/e/data-innovation-day-2014-washington-dc-tickets-9624347683 </div> </div> </div> <p>On January 23, 2014, the Center for Data Innovation will host its signature conference, “Data Innovation Day–Washington, DC” to focus on how policy can spur more data-driven innovation. It will bring together luminaries from the public, private, nonprofit and academic sectors to share ideas and perspectives on how data is transforming our economy and society. In addition to a series of panel discussions, lightning talks, and keynote presentations, the conference will feature a technology expo where participants can see first-hand the benefits of data.&nbsp;</p><p><strong><a href="http://www.datainnovationday.org/" target="_blank">Watch the event live.</a></strong></p><p><br />To learn about sponsorship opportunities, please contact <a href="mailto:info@datainnovation.org" target="_blank">info@datainnovation.org</a>.</p><div class="field field-type-computed field-field-rel-ids-issues"> <div class="field-label">Rel IDs for issues:</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 5069 </div> </div> </div> Internet Thu, 23 Jan 2014 13:00:00 +0000 akey 5069 at http://www.itif.org The Role of Intangible, Knowledge-based Capital in Economic Growth http://www.itif.org/events/role-intangible-knowledge-based-capital-economic-growth <div class="field field-type-text field-field-enablereg"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Enable Registration </div> </div> </div> <p>As economies become more innovation-based, intangible capital (e.g., R&amp;D, copyrights, software, skills, brands, organizational know-how) is becoming a&nbsp;more important driver of growth and competitiveness.&nbsp;What nations are investing in the most intangible assets and which have the most intangible capital?&nbsp;Are all kinds of intangible capital equal when it comes to driving growth? Are public and private returns from intangible capital the same?&nbsp; &nbsp;</p> <p>Please join ITIF to hear a presentation on the recently released&nbsp;“OECD Science, Technology and Industry Scoreboard 2013 Innovation for Growth” report, with a particular focus on intangible capital.&nbsp;The presentation of the report findings will be followed by reactions from experts in intangible capital issues.</p><div class="field field-type-computed field-field-rel-ids-issues"> <div class="field-label">Rel IDs for issues:</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 5226,5285 </div> </div> </div> Science and R&D Tue, 14 Jan 2014 14:00:00 +0000 akey 5226 at http://www.itif.org Book Discussion: Doing Capitalism in the Innovation Economy http://www.itif.org/events/book-discussion-doing-capitalism-innovation-economy <div class="field field-type-text field-field-enablereg"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Enable Registration </div> </div> </div> <p>William Janeway is one of the world's leading "theorist-practitioners" in the fields of innovation and technology. An active venture capital investor, he built and led Warburg Pincus Technology Investment, which provided financial backing to a host of successful tech companies including BEA Systems and Veritas Software. <br /> <br /> In addition, he has written extensively on the evolution of the innovation economy, including the need for new theories and government strategies to address the economic and societal transformations taking place. In his 2012 book,<em>&nbsp;Doing Capitalism in the Innovation Economy: Markets, Speculation and the State, </em>Janeway demolishes much of the anachronistic neoclassical economic thinking around innovation and presents a realistic view of how innovation happens, as well as the key role of government in spurring it.</p> <p>Please join Mr. Janeway for a rousing discussion on the central tenants of his book as well as a broader analysis of the private and public sector reforms that are essential to maximizing innovation-based growth.</p><div class="field field-type-computed field-field-rel-ids-issues"> <div class="field-label">Rel IDs for issues:</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 5191,5266 </div> </div> </div> Economic Theory Wed, 08 Jan 2014 14:00:00 +0000 akey 5191 at http://www.itif.org A Plan for Growth-Oriented Deficit Reduction http://www.itif.org/events/plan-growth-oriented-deficit-reduction <div class="field field-type-text field-field-enablereg"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Enable Registration </div> </div> </div> <p>The recent Congressional budget agreement, welcome as it is, just postpones rather than solves our budget challenge. Moreover, the "Washington budget consensus", based on cutting the debt by putting "everything on the table," including growth-inducing investments and tax cuts, will not lead to the budget solutions that will maximize U.S. growth.</p> <p>ITIF has developed a unique budget and debt proposal based on growing GDP and reducing the debt-to-GDP-ratio, including investment, tax and entitlement spending reforms that will boost U.S. productivity, innovation and competitiveness. Please join ITIF and an expert panel to discuss this proposal.</p><div class="field field-type-computed field-field-rel-ids-issues"> <div class="field-label">Rel IDs for issues:</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 5224,5264 </div> </div> </div> Economic Theory Tue, 07 Jan 2014 14:00:00 +0000 akey 5224 at http://www.itif.org The Role of Innovation and Technology in Driving Government Productivity http://www.itif.org/events/role-innovation-and-technology-driving-government-productivity <div class="field field-type-text field-field-enablereg"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Enable Registration </div> </div> </div> <p>With all levels of government facing a budget crunch, governments will have to find ways to cut costs without cutting services<em style="font-family: sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19.1875px;">—</em>in other words, boost productivity.&nbsp; But to date, boosting productivity in government operations has taken a back seat to other priorities. In fact, the federal government doesn’t even measure government productivity. Fortunately, information technology<em style="font-family: sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19.1875px;">—</em>including cloud computing, data analytics, kiosks, and mobile apps<em style="font-family: sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19.1875px;">—</em>now gives government the tools it needs to significantly boost the productivity of government operations. The real question is whether they will take advantage of them.</p> <p>ITIF will host a panel discussion to examine how technology can drive government productivity and what needs to be done to take advantage of this opportunity, including policy reforms to spur technology adoption.</p><div class="field field-type-computed field-field-rel-ids-issues"> <div class="field-label">Rel IDs for issues:</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 5068,5228 </div> </div> </div> E-Government Productivity Tue, 17 Dec 2013 14:00:00 +0000 akey 5068 at http://www.itif.org A Decade After CAN-SPAM http://www.itif.org/events/decade-after-can-spam <div class="field field-type-text field-field-enablereg"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Enable Registration </div> </div> </div> <p>A decade ago Congress passed the CAN-SPAM Act, the first piece of federal legislation to try to tackle the problem of unsolicited email. In addition to costing businesses and consumers billions of dollars annually, spam is a common attack vector for cybersecurity threats like malware and phishing attacks. While existing laws have had some success, many users still receive spam, and more can be done to combat this problem. On the tenth anniversary of CAN-SPAM, ITIF will host a panel discussion on the technological and legal aspects of the battle against spammers and what additional steps policymakers might take to address this problem.</p><div class="field field-type-computed field-field-rel-ids-issues"> <div class="field-label">Rel IDs for issues:</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 5174,5227 </div> </div> </div> Cybersecurity Internet Mon, 16 Dec 2013 15:00:00 +0000 akey 5174 at http://www.itif.org Strengthening National Laboratory Commercialization http://www.itif.org/events/strengthening-national-laboratory-commercialization <div class="field field-type-text field-field-enablereg"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Enable Registration </div> </div> </div> <p>Post-World War II era U.S. science, technology, and innovation policy has been defined by a linear approach to public investment in basic research. For many decades, this worked because the United States was one of the few countries with the technological capabilities to translate research into new products and services. But in today’s intensely competitive global economy where nations are fiercely competing for innovation advantage, this paradigm is no longer tenable. Robust public investments in basic research remain critical, but equally as important are investments and institutional reforms to commercialize new ideas from the laboratory into the marketplace.</p> <p>To advance the debate on potential policy reforms, the House Technology Transfer Caucus, Co-Chairs Rep. Gus Bilirakis (R-FL) and Rep. Ben Ray Luján (D-NM), the Information Technology &amp; Innovation Foundation, and Innovation Associates are convening a series of Capitol Hill briefings featuring leading experts in innovation policy.</p> <p>The second of these events will examine the Department of Energy’s National Laboratories. The Labs are a key driver of energy innovation and represent over $14 billion in annual federally-funded research investment. Yet, as ITIF found in a <a href="http://www.itif.org/publications/turning-page-reimagining-national-labs-21st-century-innovation-economy">nonpartisan study</a> with the Heritage Foundation and the Center for American Progress, the link between the National Labs and industry is weak, technology transfer remains a low priority, commercialization programs are underfunded, and the Labs are disconnected from regional economic development. Furthermore, recent national recommendations from the <a href="http://innovationassoc.com/files/WH.L2MSummit.Recommendations.FINAL.Aug.09.2013.-2.pdf">Lab-to-Market Inter-Agency Summit</a> sponsored by the White House OSTP and NIH called for greater incentives for National Labs to commercialize research and for placing a higher priority on commercialization<span style="font-size: 13.5pt; line-height: 115%; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif;"><strong>.</strong></span>&nbsp;Reforming this system will be critical to enhancing the long-term impact National Lab research can have on addressing key national challenges. This panel discussion will evaluate these issues and analyze potential solutions.</p><div class="field field-type-computed field-field-rel-ids-issues"> <div class="field-label">Rel IDs for issues:</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 5125,5220 </div> </div> </div> Science and R&D Tue, 10 Dec 2013 15:00:00 +0000 akey 5125 at http://www.itif.org Enhancing Technology Commercialization through SBIR/STTR Reform http://www.itif.org/events/enhancing-technology-commercialization-through-sbirsttr-reform <div class="field field-type-text field-field-enablereg"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> off </div> </div> </div> <p>Post-World War II era U.S. science, technology, and innovation policy has been defined by a linear approach to public investment in basic research. For many decades, this policy worked because the United States was one of the few countries with the technological capabilities to translate research into new products and services. But in today’s intensely competitive global economy where nations are fiercely competing for innovation advantage, this paradigm is no longer tenable. Robust public investments in basic research remain critical, but equally as important are investments and institutional reforms to commercialize new ideas from the laboratory into the marketplace.</p> <p>To advance the debate on potential policy reforms, the House Technology Transfer Caucus, Co-Chairs Rep. Gus Bilirakis (R-FL) and Rep. Ben Ray Luján (D-NM), the Information Technology &amp; Innovation Foundation, and Innovation Associates are convening a series of Capitol Hill briefings featuring leading experts in innovation policy.</p> <p>The first of these events will examine reforms to improve the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. SBIR/STTR are critical policy tools federal agencies use to support small business R&amp;D and innovation. While recent program reauthorizations increased the share of agency budgets set-aside for SBIR/STTR, more needs to be done to maximize the value and commercial potential stemming from these programs. This panel discussion will investigate the reforms that are needed to advance SBIR/STTR and boost commercialization through small businesses.</p><div class="field field-type-computed field-field-rel-ids-issues"> <div class="field-label">Rel IDs for issues:</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 5123,5186 </div> </div> </div> Science and R&D Tue, 03 Dec 2013 14:00:00 +0000 akey 5123 at http://www.itif.org Are Advancements in Computing Over? The Future of Moore’s Law http://www.itif.org/events/are-advancements-computing-over-future-moore-s-law <div class="field field-type-text field-field-enablereg"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Enable Registration </div> </div> </div> <p>From our smart phones to our broadband networks to the advanced electronics in our cars, we owe them all to “Moore’s Law.” Named after Intel co-founder Gordon Moore, the term refers to a prediction made in the 1960s that computing power would double every two years. And miraculously it has: computing power is over 1.1 million times faster today than it was 40 years ago. Without this, our digital era would be stillborn.</p> <p>However, it’s not clear that past progress will continue, at least at the same exponential rate. Some even argue that we are reaching limits, at least with silicon-based semiconductors. If so, the negative consequences of a slow-down in Moore’s Law would be enormous, for new needed innovations in robotics, intelligent machines, data analytics, defense technology and others all require Moore’s Law’s progress to continue. To address this challenge, foundational innovation in semiconductor electronics is required in both the public and private sector to insure computing power continues to advance and promote our future digital economy.</p> <p>This panel of world class semiconductor experts will discuss the current state of semiconductor innovation, the technologies that might drive innovation in the future, and the private and public sector reforms and investments that are needed to meet the potential of Moore’s Law.</p><p>Read a <a href="http://www.innovationfiles.org/robust-federal-investment-in-scientific-research-critical-to-sustaining-moores-law/" target="_blank">blog post on the event</a>.</p><div class="field field-type-computed field-field-rel-ids-issues"> <div class="field-label">Rel IDs for issues:</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 5002,5152 </div> </div> </div> Internet Productivity Thu, 21 Nov 2013 14:00:00 +0000 akey 5002 at http://www.itif.org The Evolution of Digital Content http://www.itif.org/events/evolution-digital-content <div class="field field-type-text field-field-enablereg"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> off </div> </div> </div> <p>The past few years have seen a surge in the availability of legal, digital content. Consumers today have more choices than ever in how they get online access to movies, TV shows, books, music and more. How will the market for digital content continue to change in the coming years?&nbsp; What impact will these changes have on companies’ bottom line? And how will these changes ultimately impact consumers? Join ITIF for a conversation with an expert panel about the evolution of digital content.</p><div class="field field-type-computed field-field-rel-ids-issues"> <div class="field-label">Rel IDs for issues:</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 4991,5073 </div> </div> </div> Intellectual Property Internet Tue, 29 Oct 2013 16:00:00 +0000 akey 4991 at http://www.itif.org Utility 2.0: Building the Next-Gen Electric Grid through Innovation http://www.itif.org/events/utility-20-building-next-gen-electric-grid-through-innovation <div class="field field-type-text field-field-enablereg"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Enable Registration </div> </div> </div> <p>Developing and deploying smart grid technologies is fundamentally important to building infrastructure resilience, growing the clean economy, and increasing U.S. productivity. But like many national challenges, there are a number of technological, institutional, and regulatory issues standing in the way of progress. There’s no one stakeholder, public or private, that can singlehandedly implement the smart grid. Nonetheless, grid technology innovations are beginning to disrupt the system, with consequences to consumers, utilities, regulators, and policymakers. To gauge how innovation is shaping the electric grid of the future, The Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF), the Digital Energy and Sustainability Solutions Campaign (DESSC), and the Energy Future Coalition (EFC) have convened a diverse group of experts to discuss: What innovative technologies are advancing the smart grid? How can policy accelerate this transition? Does America need a Utility 2.0?&nbsp;</p><div class="field field-type-computed field-field-rel-ids-issues"> <div class="field-label">Rel IDs for issues:</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 4979,5074 </div> </div> </div> Energy & Climate Tue, 29 Oct 2013 13:30:00 +0000 akey 4979 at http://www.itif.org Challenging the Clean Energy Deployment Consensus http://www.itif.org/events/challenging-clean-energy-deployment-consensus <div class="field field-type-text field-field-enablereg"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Enable Registration </div> </div> </div> <p>A majority of clean energy advocates believe that the world has all the low-carbon technologies it needs to address climate change; what we lack is the political will to mandate and subsidize their deployment. To support this view advocates of this “Clean Energy Deployment Consensus” point to a number of studies assessing the technical readiness of clean energy technologies. Unfortunately, as ITIF shows in its new report <em>Challenging the Clean Energy Deployment Consensus</em> these reports often gloss over major challenges facing clean energy, including significantly higher costs, sub-optimal performance, and challenges in grid integration and storage. In addition many advocates miss the critical message of the need for innovation inherent in the literature. Without a comprehensive and aggressive innovation strategy clean energy will not be cheap enough and good enough to be adopted voluntarily around the planet.</p> <p>Please join ITIF and a panel of leading experts to discuss the roots of the Deployment Consensus, the reasons why a "deployment-first" strategy will fail, and why innovation-driven energy policies are the solution</p><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-event-related-publication"> <div class="field-label">Related Report (Publication):</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/publications/challenging-clean-energy-deployment-consensus">Challenging the Clean Energy Deployment Consensus</a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-computed field-field-rel-ids-issues"> <div class="field-label">Rel IDs for issues:</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 5006,5050,5049 </div> </div> </div> Energy & Climate Wed, 23 Oct 2013 13:00:00 +0000 akey 5006 at http://www.itif.org Nordic Innovation: What Can America Learn from the Scandinavian Innovation Ecosystem? http://www.itif.org/events/nordic-innovation-what-can-america-learn-scandinavian-innovation-ecosystem <div class="field field-type-text field-field-enablereg"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Enable Registration </div> </div> </div> <p>Two decades ago, most pundits wrote off the Nordic countries, arguing that their social democratic model of high taxes, generous social benefits, and worker security were antithetical to innovation, productivity, and growth. But since 2000 the Nordic economies<a href="http://www.economist.com/news/special-report/21570840-nordic-countries-are-reinventing-their-model-capitalism-says-adrian" target="_blank"> have thrived</a> by increasing government funding for R&amp;D and innovation, implementing competitive tax codes with lower corporate rates and investment incentives, deploying ICTs, and introducing labor flexicurity models. Moreover, led by innovation agencies including Finland’s Tekes and SITRA, Sweden’s Agency for Growth Policy and Analysis and VINNOVA, and Denmark’s Agency for Science, Technology, and Innovation, the Nordic countries have been pioneers in developing national innovation strategies and building innovation-based economies.</p> <p>Please join ITIF on October 16 as representatives from Finland, Denmark, and Sweden share insights from the successes—and ongoing challenges—these nations have experienced in crafting innovation policy and building globally competitive, 21<sup>st</sup>-century innovation economies.</p><p>This event is free, open to the public and complies with ethics rules.</p><div class="field field-type-computed field-field-rel-ids-issues"> <div class="field-label">Rel IDs for issues:</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 4875,5029 </div> </div> </div> Economic Theory Trade Wed, 16 Oct 2013 13:00:00 +0000 akey 4875 at http://www.itif.org