International Broadband Quality: How's that Policy Working?

June 13, 2013

WASHINGTON (June 12, 2013) - The United States and Europe have chosen different policy models for broadband: While the U. S. emphasizes "facilities-based competition" and mobile technology freedom for broadband networks, Europe follows a "structural separation" regime for wireline networks and a single technology mandate for mobile. Theoretically, the European model should produce lower prices, while the U. S. model should enable greater innovation, but the results are not always as predicted.
The Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF) will host a panel discussion of leading experts from both sides of the Atlantic who will evaluate the present state of broadband networks in the U. S. and Europe, highlighting areas of remarkable success and clear failure in the two contexts. The event will be held from 12:00 P.M. to 1:30 P.M., Monday, June 17 at ITIF, 1101 K Street, N.W., Suite 610.
"By analyzing the policies and outcomes of the American and European broadband models we can better assess the effectiveness of each system and identify best practices that can further broadband innovation globally," notes Richard Bennett, Senior Research Fellow with ITIF and organizer of the event.
The panel discussion will be moderated by ITIF President Robert Atkinson and will feature Jeffrey Eisenach, Managing Director and Principal with Navigant Economics, Roslyn Layton, Vice President for Digital Strategy with Strand Consult and Martin Thelle, Managing Director with Copenhagen Economics.
Eisenach has over three decades of experience in U.S. broadband policy and previously served in senior positions with the Federal Trade Commission and the White House Office of Management and Budget. Layton is a leading strategy consultant for the European broadband industry. Prior to joining Strand she served in senior digital business posts with numerous companies around the world. Thelle is an expert on the European broadband model and has published studies on the digital single market, online liability and competition in networking industries.
Register for the event.

Contact:
William Dube
wdube@itif.org
202-626-5744

WASHINGTON (June 12, 2013) - The United States and Europe have chosen different policy models for broadband: While the U. S. emphasizes "facilities-based competition" and mobile technology freedom for broadband networks, Europe follows a "structural separation" regime for wireline networks and a single technology mandate for mobile. Theoretically, the European model should produce lower prices, while the U. S. model should enable greater innovation, but the results are not always as predicted.

The Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF) will host a panel discussion of leading experts from both sides of the Atlantic who will evaluate the present state of broadband networks in the U. S. and Europe, highlighting areas of remarkable success and clear failure in the two contexts. The event will be held from 12:00 P.M. to 1:30 P.M., Monday, June 17 at ITIF, 1101 K Street, N.W., Suite 610.

"By analyzing the policies and outcomes of the American and European broadband models we can better assess the effectiveness of each system and identify best practices that can further broadband innovation globally," notes Richard Bennett, Senior Research Fellow with ITIF and organizer of the event.

The panel discussion will be moderated by ITIF President Robert Atkinson and will feature Jeffrey Eisenach, Managing Director and Principal with Navigant Economics, Roslyn Layton, Vice President for Digital Strategy with Strand Consult and Martin Thelle, Managing Director with Copenhagen Economics.

Eisenach has over three decades of experience in U.S. broadband policy and previously served in senior positions with the Federal Trade Commission and the White House Office of Management and Budget. Layton is a leading strategy consultant for the European broadband industry. Prior to joining Strand she served in senior digital business posts with numerous companies around the world. Thelle is an expert on the European broadband model and has published studies on the digital single market, online liability and competition in networking industries.

Register for the event.

 

 

###

The Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF) is a non-profit, non-partisan think tank whose mission is to formulate and promote public policies to advance technological innovation and productivity internationally, in Washington, and in the states. Recognizing the vital role of technology in ensuring prosperity, ITIF focuses on innovation, productivity, and digital economy issues. Learn more at www.itif.org.