A new PwC study found that U.S. companies consistently pay a higher effective tax rate than their overseas competitors, writes Joe Kennedy in Innovation Files.
January 30, 2009
Under current tax law, U.S. companies can defer the U.S. tax on the profits earned by their foreign-based subsidiaries until they transfer those profits back to the parent company here in the United States. In their new report, Robert Shapiro and Aparna Mathur analyze the impact of temporarily reducing the U.S. tax on repatriated profits on U.S. jobs, capital investment, and the financial squeeze.
September 24, 2008
In today’s economy, innovation – the development and adoption of new products and services, more efficient production process­es, and new business models – is the most important factor driv­ing increases in American standards of living.
October 17, 2007
Rep. Anna Eshoo (D-CA), Rob Atkinson (ITIF), and James Gattuso (Heritage Foundation) argue for the need to make permanent the ban on Internet access taxes in "The Hill."
July 24, 2007
Rob Atkinson’s article in the July 2007 issue of the Journal of Technology Transfer arguing for the importance of the Research and Experimentation Tax credit. The article calls for several important changes to the credit: doubling its current value, modifying the Alternative Simplified Credit to become incremental, and expanding the flat credit for collaborative R&D.
June 17, 2007
In this report ITIF explains why Congress should make the current moratorium permanent and eliminate the grandfather clause which allows some states to tax Internet access at the expense of the nation as a whole.
April 2, 2007
ITIF outlines several steps Congress should take to strengthen the credit.
September 5, 2006
The Research and Experimentation Tax Credit can play an important role in ensuring that the United States remains an attractive location for global companies to conduct research. Not only does the credit spur the retention and attraction of investment in R&D in the United States, new scholarly research shows convincingly that the credit is an effective tool for stimulating additional research, which in turn leads to faster economic growth. However, while the United States had the distinction of providing the most generous tax treatment of R&D of all OECD nations in the early 1990s, by 2004 we had dropped to 17th most generous.