Issues

October 29, 2008
This blog post reviews findings of a recent academic study on the low numbers of women in advanced mathematics programs, citing a need “to make math cool again” to spur U.S. competitiveness, because now doing mathematics for fun is “deemed uncool within the social context of USA middle and high schools…and can lead to social ostracism.”


October 14, 2008
ITIF hosted a breakfast forum on Tuesday, October 14th with Dr. Erica Fuchs, Assistant Professor in the Department of Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University. Dr. Fuchs discussed the results of a new study examining the role of the Defense Advanced Research Products Agency (DARPA) between 1992 and the present on innovation in the United States.

October 11, 2008
In a new report, Timely, Targeted, Temporary and Transformative: Crafting an Innovation-Based Economic Stimulus Package, ITIF lays out eight specific proposals that would not only spur spending and economic activity in the short run, but also help addresses these challenges going forward.

October 8, 2008
ITIF will host a forum to discuss the release of a major new report Digital Quality of Life: Understanding the Personal and Social Benefits of the Information Technology Revolution, a companion to the 2007 report Digital Prosperity.

October 8, 2008
In this article, ITIF President Rob Atkinson argues that the United States needs to be preparing now for what it will do when the information technology-driven economy begins to become less of an engine for economic growth at some point in the future.

October 2, 2008
This report shows how IT is the key enabler of many of today’s key improvements in our lives and society—from better education and health care, to a more energy-efficient environment.


September 24, 2008
In today’s economy, innovation – the development and adoption of new products and services, more efficient production process­es, and new business models – is the most important factor driv­ing increases in American standards of living.

September 12, 2008
The U.S. political dialogue gives scant attention to innovation and policy to promote innovative activity. This is because the three dominant economic policy models – conservative neoclassical, liberal neoclassical and neo-Keynesian economic doctrines–ignore the role of innovation and technology in achieving economic growth.