Seventy-nine percent of the software installed on Chinese computers in 2009, valued at $7.6 billion, was not paid for.

As the U.S. International Trade Commission's report, China: Effects of Intellectual Property Infringement and Indigenous Innovation Policies on the U.S. Economy, found, widespread infringement of music, films, entertainment software, books, and other copyrighted materials continues unabated in China, despite repeated government promises that China's government will curtail these practices. Likewise, in his report, Suttmeier cites evidence that 79 percent of the software installed on Chinese computers in 2009, valued at $7.6 billion, was not paid for. Yet it's not just private citizens or enterprises using unpurchased software: despite a ten-year-old government order, some estimate that as much as 80 percent of Chinese government computers run versions of Microsoft Windows operating systems that were illegally copied. Overall, China's failure to adequately enforce U.S. firms' intellectual property rights in 2009 cost those firms $48.2 billion in sales, royalties, or license fee; deterred $107 billion in exports; and cost 2.1 million American jobs.