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The Obama administration should detail Vice President Biden to lead a new free trade coalition.

The Obama administration should detail Vice President Biden to lead an effort to build a coalition with the Europeans, Canadians, Australians, Japanese, and whoever else will come aboard to lay out a renewed vision for globalization grounded in the perspective that markets should drive global trade and investment, that countries should not seek sustained trade surpluses, that currency prices should be set by the market (or at least not manipulated for competitive advantage); and that fair international competition and “good” innovation policies that leave all countries better off. The United States could start this with efforts to establish a TAP, a Trans-Atlantic Partnership: a new trade agreement with Europe and perhaps the Commonwealth nations.

Congress should divert funds earmarked for the federal Electric Vehicle Tax Credit to provide more investment in energy storage R&D.

To more aggressively fund battery innovation, the key barrier to affordable and viable electric vehicles, Congress should shift funding earmarked for the EV federal tax credit and instead boost funding for battery R&D at ARPA-E, the Battery Innovation Hub, and the National Labs.

Congress should legislate the collaboration between the Department of Defense and the Department of Energy on energy innovation.

DOD and DOE signed a memorandum of understanding in the summer of 2010 that laid the groundwork for cooperation on the development of an array of clean energy technologies, including advanced batteries. Firming up this collaboration would be a simple way to ensure both departments’ efforts are productive and aligned. So Congress should officially legislate the collaboration between DOD and DOE so additional funds could be appropriated for their efforts.

The Department of Energy should create a “BatteryShot” Initiative modeled after the successful SunShot program to align battery innovation programs.

The Secretary of Energy should create a BatteryShot Initiative that coordinates government battery RD&D efforts and establishes clear metrics for success, such as ARPA-E’s goal of producing a battery with a total system cost of less than $250/kWh and a range of at least 300 miles per charge. The new Initiative should be even more ambitious and set more aggressive goals to make EVs more competitive than gasoline cars.

Congress should increase funds for the United States Trade Representative to step up enforcement of clean energy trade issues.

To facilitate increased funding, Congress should create a new office of Globalization Strategies within USTR. Within this new office a special unit to address green mercantilist trade practices should be formed so that the U.S. can bring cases whenever its clean energy interests are being hurt through trade rule violations.

Congress should uniformly apply the performance copyright for sound recordings to all broadcasts.

Congress should uniformly apply the performance copyright for sound recordings to all broadcasts. The current system discriminates against non-terrestrial music services by imposing a performance copyright on sound recordings for all non-terrestrial radio broadcasts. Congress should promote technology-neutral policies to ensure a fair and competitive market for all forms of radio. Not only does this exemption for terrestrial radio disadvantage competing technologies, it also results in unfair compensation to the copyright holders. Congress should take an all-or-nothing approach so that terrestrial radio, Internet radio, satellite radio and other digital music services can compete fairly. In other words, everybody should pay (ideally), or nobody should pay, but the discrepancy should be eliminated. Terrestrial radio should not be the only technology platform exempt from paying royalties for performances of sound recordings.

The FCC should let existing avenues of self-regulation and co-regulation be pursued instead of regulating software on mobile devices to allow for continued innovation and growth in this industry.

Rather than duplicate existing efforts, the FCC should allow existing avenues of self-regulation and co-regulation to be pursued. Given the rapid rate of change in this industry, where possible, the FCC should apply a light touch and rely on flexible industry codes of conduct, rather than more restrictive government regulations, to govern how information is used. The FCC should not extend its authority to regulate the software that is installed on mobile devices. The current uses of CPNI by carriers are appropriate and neither the FCC nor consumers advocacy group have identified any specific harms to consumers. While privacy is an important issue to consider, the potential negative impact of additional regulation on the mobile Internet, mobile devices, and mobile applications should be considered as well. The FCC should instead use its expertise to help identify issues that need attention and actively participate in existing multistakeholder efforts to improve consumer privacy.

The WTO should create a Clean Technology Agreement modeled on the ITA to combat green mercantilism.

Trade negotiators should create a global free trade zone for clean energy products and services, modeled on the Information Technology Agreement (ITA). Clean Technology Agreement (CTA) would reverse this trend and provide two immediate benefits. First, the CTA would expand global clean technology trade. By eliminating tariffs, prices would decline and global demand would increase, leading to greater revenues that could be reinvested in more RD&D to develop even better clean energy technologies. Second, it could also reduce growing clean energy trade tensions and provide an avenue for negotiating a tariff-free global clean energy market.

Congress should amend the Internal Revenue Code such that statistical agencies such as the BEA and BLS gain access to the Census Bureau’s Business Register for more accurate reporting.

U.S. statistical agencies are barred by law from sharing important microdata with one another, and this leads to statistics on the U.S. economy that are badly inaccurate. These accuracy problems affect everything from the BEA’s national and state GDP statistics, to the BLS’s and the Census Bureau’s (separate) employment, payroll and establishment statistics, to statistics on the productivity growth and trade balances in strategic sectors such as manufacturing. And because these statistics are used by the federal government to make fiscal and monetary policy decisions, this data sharing problem leads to misdiagnosis of economic problems and ineffective policies. Moreover, the lack of data sharing leads to work redundancy (many agencies procuring their own data to produce similar statistics), increasing budget costs while also increasing the reporting burden on private businesses. Congress should amend the Internal Revenue Code such that statistical agencies such as the BEA and BLS gain access to the Census Bureau’s Business Register (which is derived from IRS data).

Congress should maintain NIH funding at a level commensurate with at least one quarter of one percent of national GDP to keep the U.S. competitive in this critical sector.

Congress should maintain the stability of funding levels with minimal fluctuations from year to year; and Congress should maintain NIH funding at a level commensurate with at least one quarter of one percent (0.25%) of national GDP or higher. Our nation’s baseline policy going forward should be to grow NIH funding at a rate that accounts for inflation, embraces emerging avenues of research that can propel U.S. innovative leadership, and reflects the catalytic effect biomedical research has on our nation’s economy.
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