Federal

The United States should offer young innovative firms refundable R&D tax credits in lieu of using carry-forward or carry-backward provisions on business losses.

Investing in R&D is risky, but creates a large societal benefit through knowledge spillovers. Furthermore, R&D creates new products and practices that create economic growth. Many of the benefits of R&D are not captured by the firm producing the research. This is why the United States, like most other countries, offer incentives to firms investing in R&D. Unfortunately, the incentives only impact firms that are profitable. Many of the most innovative young firms engaged in R&D, which the credit should be particularly interested in supporting, will not become profitable until after a high-risk period of R&D investment needed to develop an idea into a marketable product. Offering a refundable R&D tax credits in lieu of using carry-forward or carry-backward provisions on business losses will allow the R&D tax credit to extend to young firms. Australia, Canada, France, Norway, and the United Kingdom have already adopted this method of incentivizing R&D in young innovative firms. Additionally, within the EU, governments can give extra incentives to firms less than six years old that invest more than 15 percent of their total revenues on R&D across all regions and sectors without breaking EU state aid rules.

Congress should establish a single, national license for telehealth providers

To address this challenge and further enhance development of telehealth services, Congress should establish a single, national license for telehealth providers.

Congress should establish a single, national license for telehealth providers.

State licensing boards establish the conditions under which health care providers may practice within their state. In general, states require practitioners to be licensed in the state in which they practice medicine. Before the advent of telehealth, the state where practitioners worked and the state where patients received treatment were almost always the same. However, since telehealth allows practitioners and patients to be located in different locations—a patient in Florida may want to seek treatment from a doctor in New York—this condition is no longer necessarily true. This has raised legal challenges for providers wishing to provide telehealth services as the rules for licensing vary by jurisdiction. In addition, since health care providers cannot practice medicine without a proper license, a telehealth provider would potentially have to obtain a separate license for every state. These legal complexities create a costly and cumbersome process that impairs the widespread adoption of telehealth. To address this challenge and further enhance development of telehealth services, Congress should establish a single, national license for telehealth providers.

Congress should reorganize the U.S. Postal Service to open up all but “last mile” mail delivery to private competition and drastically reduce the size of the agency to meet the realities of the digital age.

Congress should reorganize the U.S. Postal Service to open up all but “last mile” mail delivery to private competition and drastically reduce the size of the agency to meet the realities of the digital age.

Congress should create a “name and shame” program to discourage legitimate companies from providing services to spammers and other cybercriminals.

Congress should create a “name and shame” program to discourage legitimate companies from providing services to spammers and other cybercriminals.

Congress should increase resources for enforcement actions against cybercriminals, especially those engaging in practices that facilitate spam or otherwise harm consumers and businesses.

Congress should increase resources for enforcement actions against cybercriminals, especially those engaging in practices that facilitate spam or otherwise harm consumers and businesses.

Congress should establish international transparency requirements so that it is clear what information U.S.-based and non-U.S.-based companies are disclosing to both domestic and foreign governments.

Congress should establish international transparency requirements so that it is clear what information U.S.-based and non-U.S.-based companies are disclosing to both domestic and foreign governments.

The National Security Administration needs to proactively set the record straight about what information it does and does not have access to and how this level of access compares to other countries.

The National Security Administration needs to proactively set the record straight about what information it does and does not have access to and how this level of access compares to other countries. To do this effectively, it needs to continue to declassify information about the PRISM program and allow companies to reveal more details about what information has been requested of them by the government. The economic consequences of national security decisions should be part of the debate, and this cannot happen until more details about PRISM have been revealed.

The Department of Energy should create a high-level task force to develop Department-actionable reforms to improve the effectiveness, accountability and technology transfer efforts of the National Laboratories.

The Labs system is integral to the United States federal research enterprise, representing nearly $20 billion in annual public research dollars. However, as the pace of innovation has accelerated and the complexity of national challenges has increased, the national laboratory system has not kept stride. Significant reforms are required to better catalyze innovation in the 21st century economy.