Blogs & Op-eds

A Response to the Critics

March 3, 2015
| Blogs & Op-eds

In this blog post, Stephen Rose addresses critics of his report "The False Claim That Inequality Rose During the Great Recession." He argues that no one really found faulted his analyses. They just changed the topic and implied that the report showed a lack of appreciation for the negative effect that the high level of inequality has on our country.  This is too bad, since all policy debates benefit from more, not fewer facts and analysis. 

How Open Is University Data?

February 27, 2015
| Blogs & Op-eds

While many states have joined the open data movement, state colleges and universities have largely ignored the opportunity. This is particularly disconcerting given the many potential benefits of open data for higher education, including increasing transparency, improving efficiency and enhancing research opportunities. Policymakers should investigate reforms that can extend open data policies to public colleges and universities for the benefit of students and taxpayers.

Global IP Infringement’s Significant Cost to the U.S. Economy

February 26, 2015
| Blogs & Op-eds

International infringement of U.S. intellectual property, including through counterfeiting, piracy, and outright IP theft, continues to take a significant toll on the U.S. economy.

Florida’s Cell Phone Tax Cut Could Help Reduce the Digital Divide

February 25, 2015
| Blogs & Op-eds

Mobile broadband taxation distorts the market in harmful, anti-innovation, and often discriminatory ways. By reducing Florida’s state wireless tax, Governor Scott’s plan will increase consumption of and access to of wireless and television services for Florida’s low-income households.

Combating Protectionism in the Cloud

February 24, 2015
| Blogs & Op-eds

Many countries have reacted to the global connected economy by attempting to put up barriers, such as data residency requirements, to keep leading U.S. information companies like Google, Facebook, and Microsoft from moving data across national borders. Thinking that they are cracking down on U.S. tech leaders and in the process helping their own domestic information firms, these policymakers overlook that many of their domestic companies, in a wide range of industries, now rely on cross border data flows for competitive advantage. Only by creating a global trade system that respects the free flow of data in all industries can countries fully realize the benefits of a data-driven economy.

China’s Dangerous Digital Agenda

February 23, 2015
| Blogs & Op-eds

Whether it is data or copyright, the Internet of Things or privacy, the EU and the US must agree on a common path for technology policy – centered on shared values like democracy, the rule of law, and freedom of speech. Otherwise, China, with its focus on mercantilism and restricted freedom of information, will soon be dictating the terms of trade in the world's fastest-growing economic sector. If open and pluralistic societies do not stand up for an open Internet and market-based trade, who will?

Innovation Needs to be a Central Role in the Federal Budget

February 19, 2015
| Blogs & Op-eds

As American manufacturing continues its slow recovery from the Great Recession, improved competitiveness and innovation need to remain strong federal priorities. It’s therefore heartening to note that the President’s FY 2016 budget request illustrates the administration’s belief in the power of public/private research partnerships to restore American industry’s competitive edge in advanced industries.

IP Protection: Access To Medicine Is Important But So Is Its Continued Improvement

February 17, 2015
| Blogs & Op-eds

A recent op-ed by Joseph Stiglitz wrongly paints efforts to protect medical intellectual property (IP) as a grand conspiracy by drug companies. In fact, IP rights are a central tool for protecting the global innovation ecosystem and insuring that next generation medications and treatments make it to market.

Measuring Inequality Trends During the Great Recession

February 17, 2015
| Blogs & Op-eds

In 2013 Emanuel Saez claimed that 95 percent of growth during the recovery from the Great Recession went to the top 1 percent. In reality though, the richest 1 percent of households saw their after-tax incomes decline by 27 percent from 2007 to 2011, the bottom 95 percent saw losses of only 1 or 2 percent. Therefore, contrary to the claims of some advocates, we should not abandon prow growth and innovation policies in favor of straight redistribution. By balancing innovation-centric policies with necessary reforms to strengthen the social safety net we can promote growth and provide support to the largest number of citizens.

Here’s What’s Good for Data in Obama’s 2016 Budget

February 17, 2015
| Blogs & Op-eds

From developing powerful new medical technologies to improving financial transparency, President Obama’s 2016 budget proposal includes numerous data-focused, non-partisan provisions that will offer great benefits to the public and private sector. Congress should be sure to keep this in mind as it develops its own proposal.

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