Wireless

Rural Broadband: Are We There Yet?

May 31, 2011
| Reports

The FCC’s 2011 Broadband Competition Report finds that wireline broadband deployment to rural America has stalled, while mobile broadband deployment is accelerating across the entire country. The conclusion that leaps from the report is that we’ve reached a saturation point for wireline broadband deployment, but that continued investment in mobile broadband makes this relatively unimportant. It appears that all of the markets that can sustain wireline broadband without subsidies have been served, and it will be up to other technologies – such as 4G mobile broadband and satellite – to provide broadband service to the rest of rural America. Mobile broadband is advancing at a rapid rate in terms of both performance and penetration.

Waves of Innovation: Spectrum Allocation in the Age of the Mobile Internet

May 17, 2011 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Rayburn House Office Building
45 Independence Ave SW
Room 2168
Washington
DC
20515

For many of us the term "spectrum policy" has to do with allocating relatively small parts of the radio frequency space to specific applications such as AM and FM radio, television, and public safety. It is a notion more apt for a time when we watched TV over the air and made phone calls over a wireline network. Read more »

Waves of Innovation: Spectrum Allocation in the Age of the Mobile Internet

May 17, 2011
Audio and video from the event.

For many of us the term "spectrum policy" has to do with allocating relatively small parts of the radio frequency space to specific applications such as AM and FM radio, television, and public safety. It is a notion more apt for a time when we watched TV over the air and made phone calls over a wireline network. Today these patterns of usage are reversed, and we live in a world where mobile broadband has emerged as a general-purpose technology that can support a wide range of applications. Read more »

See video

The Growing Demand for Spectrum

May 14, 2011
| Blogs & Op-eds

Improvements in spectrum efficiency do not take place at a fast-enough rate to eliminate the need for the reallocation of spectrum from legacy uses to general-purpose use by mobile broadband networks. Auctions in particular and a broad liberalization of spectrum use in general are essential to meeting consumer needs for mobile broadband services.

Competition in the Internet Ecosystem

May 10, 2011 - 11:00am - 1:00pm
Longworth House Office Building
15 Independence Ave SE
Room 1539
Washington
DC
20515

Consumers have seen vast changes in the way they use the Internet. Mobile broadband, the explosion of apps, video over the Internet are just some examples. A key question therefore is: how are changes in the Internet marketplace translating into new business models and/or industry structures? Read more »

Competition in the Internet Ecosystem

May 10, 2011
Audio and video from the event.

Consumers have seen vast changes in the way they use the Internet. Mobile broadband, the explosion of apps, video over the Internet are just some examples. A key question therefore is: how are changes in the Internet marketplace translating into new business models and/or industry structures? To consider this question, ITIF invites a series of panelists to offer their observations on the changing marketplace. Read more »

See video

Spectrum: The Capital that Drives Wireless Competition

March 28, 2011
| Blogs & Op-eds

A year ago, the National Broadband Plan called for the release of 500 MHz of new spectrum to mobile network operators, and despite a lot of talk, nothing has been done to implement this recommendation in the interim. The proposed merger of AT&T and T-Mobile, motivated by the spectrum crunch, should serve as a reminder that mobile competition depends on the resolution of the spectrum issue. Not only are spectrum squatters hindering next-generation handsets and applications, they’re impairing market competition for mobile broadband.

Congress should require that any transit authority that is receiving federal public transportation funding and has a contactless fare payment system move to an interoperable standard.

One key to driving innovation through procurement is to support open standards architectures. By adopting technologies that are interoperable with non-federal applications, federal procurement can help drive widespread adoption. Requiring transit agencies to deploy contactless fare payment systems that are interoperable with those of other transit agencies around the country would allow passengers to easily pay for ridership in different public transportation systems across the country with a single smart card. (For example, commuters could use their WMATA SmarTrip card to make payments on New York’s MTA subway system, or vice versa.)
Syndicate content