Wireless

Today's app economy has created an estimated more than 500,000 jobs.

Mobile technology is expanding the digital frontiers far beyond what was even imaginable a few short years ago. To ensure that mobile broadband reaches its full potential, nations must continue to support both the deployment of mobile broadband technologies and the proliferation of mobile computing devices through which to access the Internet. Read more »

Metro's Cellphone Installation in Trouble

The Washington Examiner
The delay caused by Powerwave could last between three months and a year, depending on the bankruptcy proceedings, said Richard Bennett.

My State of the Net Comments on the Importance of the Internet to Economic Growth

January 25, 2013
| Blogs & Op-eds

Rob Atkinson reflects on his presentation at State of the Net.

An Inconsistent Mandate

January 9, 2013
| Blogs & Op-eds

Lawmakers should ignore the “single technology mandate” for some cell networks but not for others before this ill-considered notion becomes a precedent that sets the U.S. on the road to a European-style, innovation-killing mobile regulation regime.

Sparks Will Fly at Spectrum Incentive Auctions Hearing

December 12, 2012
| Blogs & Op-eds

On December 12, 2012, the House Energy and Commerce Committee will hold a hearing with all five FCC commissioners to examine the upcoming spectrum incentive auction. Sparks will fly over the licensed vs. unlicensed apportionment and over bidder eligibility, but these issues would not be nearly so contentious if civilians had access to some of the spectrum currently held by the military.

Does the PCAST Report Move Spectrum Policy in the Right Direction?

September 21, 2012 - 9:30am - 11:00am
The Information Technology and Innovation Foundation
1101 K Street NW
Suite 610A
Washington
DC
20005

The President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) recently issued a controversial report on spectrum policy. The report declares the current system of spectrum reallocation "unsustainable" and recommends that the sharing of raw spectrum by multiple network operators should be the new norm. Read more »

Does the PCAST Report Move Spectrum Policy in the Right Direction?

September 21, 2012
Panel debate over the implications of the recent PCAST spectrum report.

The President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) recently issued a controversial report on spectrum policy. The report declares the current system of spectrum reallocation "unsustainable" and recommends that the sharing of raw spectrum by multiple network operators should be the new norm. The panel will explore the report's many findings and recommendations in order to answer the following questions: Read more »

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Comparing the 2012 Presidential Candidates’ Technology and Innovation Policies

September 12, 2012
| Reports

Despite the obligatory acknowledgment of innovation’s central role in U.S. economic growth, the 2012 campaign has not yet seen a serious conversation emerge regarding the policies sorely needed to revitalize U.S. innovation-based economic competitiveness. Moreover, rather than adopt an “all of the above” approach to innovation policy that includes corporate tax and regulatory reform as well as increased federal investment in research and development (R&D), digital infrastructure, and skills, the candidates stress policies from “each column,” with Governor Romney focusing more on the former and President Obama more on the latter. This is unfortunate. For, as we write in the book Innovation Economics: The Race for Global Advantage, U.S. policymakers need to recognize that the United States is engaged in a fierce race for innovation-based economic growth. To win this race, the United States will need to adopt a new, bipartisan Washington Innovation Consensus that places science, technology, innovation, and entrepreneurship at the center of economic policy-making and recognizes that both parties bring good ideas to the table in this regard. 

This report highlights the candidates' technology and innovation policies with the aim of amplifying the national dialogue around bolstering innovation-based economic growth. The report begins with an overview of each candidate’s general philosophy on technology, innovation, and trade policy, and then compares the candidates’ specific policy positions across 10 policy areas:

  1. Innovation and R&D
  2. Energy Innovation
  3. Tax
  4. Manufacturing
  5. Trade
  6. Education and Skills
  7. Broadband and Telecommunications
  8. Regulation
  9. Internet/Digital Economy
  10. Life Sciences and Biotechnology

The report is based on information gathered directly from the campaigns’ websites and policy documents or from media reports of statements made by the candidates. In some cases where a candidate has not articulated a specific position, the candidate’s record while in office or the position of the candidate’s party (as reflected in the Democratic or Republican party platforms) is used as a proxy.

ITIF is a non-partisan research and educational institution—a think tank—focused on innovation, productivity, and digital economy issues, and does not endorse either candidate. Rather, this report seeks to provide a factual, impartial comparison of the candidates’ technology and innovation policies.

Under-the-Table Subsidies

September 11, 2012
| Blogs & Op-eds

Under the table subsidies provide another example of where the U.S. is going wrong in spectrum reforms.

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