Trade

Globalization-related issues.

Trade Liberalization Enhances Economic Growth: New Evidence

November 4, 2013
| Blogs & Op-eds

Using data from the Annual Social Information Report and the Brazilian Occupational Classification, a new paper compares the change in the demand for either “routine” or “non-routine” tasks before and after the repeal of the “Informatics Law” in Brazil to the percentage of workers using computers.

The Frontiers of Economic Integration Conference

October 30, 2013
| Presentations

Stephen Ezell participated in a panel on Electronic Commerce and Data Privacy at the Frontiers of Economic Integration Conference hosted by The Chicago Council on Global Affairs on October 30 at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. 

Visit the Chicago Council on Global Affairs site.

Value-Driven Service Innovation

October 23, 2013
| Presentations

Stephen Ezell led a workshop on value-driven service innovation at the Said Business School in Oxford, England on October 23 and 24. 

Innovation Mercantilism’s Dangerous Consequences for American Manufacturing

October 22, 2013
| Blogs & Op-eds

Over the last decade, a growing number of countries have come to embrace a new kind of protectionist trade policy that seeks to expand domestic innovation capacity and technology exports by manipulating the international trading system and subverting the intent of free trade. ITIF calls these practices “innovation mercantilism,” and they cover a wide range of methods, including localization barriers to trade (LBTs), indigenous innovation, currency manipulation, and intellectual property theft. Together, these policies drastically inhibit the ability of U.S. enterprises to effectively compete.

Nordic Innovation: What Can America Learn from the Scandinavian Innovation Ecosystem?

October 16, 2013 - 9:00am - 10:30am
The Information Technology and Innovation Foundation
1101 K Street NW
Suite 610A
Washington
DC
20005

Two decades ago, most pundits wrote off the Nordic countries, arguing that their social democratic model of high taxes, generous social benefits, and worker security were antithetical to innovation, productivity, and growth. Read more »

Allow companies participating in pre-competitive research to freely transfer ownership and access rights for IP to foundation affiliates across and between the European Union and the United States.

Allow companies participating in pre-competitive research to freely transfer ownership and access rights for IP to foundation affiliates across and between the European Union and the United States.

The World Trade Organization's 2012 World Trade Report finds that non-tariff measures are almost twice as trade restrictive as tariffs.

Despite, or perhaps because of, the lowering but not elimination of tariffs, countries' use of non-tariff barriers (NTBs) is on the rise. Examples include: quantitative restrictions; price controls; non-tariff charges, unwarranted customs procedures; discriminatory health and safety standards; currency manipulation; discriminatory application of technical standards; and localization barriers to trade (LBTs). For innovation industries, this creates harmful side-effects, including keeping unit costs high, reducing revenues and hampering innovation.

Maximizing Innovation Should be Central Goal of T-TIP Agreement

How to Craft an Innovation Maximizing T-TIP Agreement

October 10, 2013
| Reports

The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (T-TIP) Agreement should be designed to maximize innovation in the United States and the European Union. Innovation is a central driver of economic growth, and thus a key focal point of U.S. and EU economic development strategies. Ideally, the T-TIP would eliminate all tariffs and non-tariff barriers to trade. However, realistically, both the European Union and the United States are going to make trade-offs, and it is important to make these trade-offs in a manner that promotes innovation-based trade as a fundamental driver of global growth. 

Policy Recommendations:

Eliminate all tariffs in trade on innovation industries.
Liberalize trade in innovative services, especially telecommunication services and audiovisual services.
Create transparent, science-based regulatory regimes in the pharmaceutical, automotive and agricultural sectors.
Prohibit the use of data center localization as a condition of market access.
Honor existing international data flow agreements, such as the Safe Harbor.
Introduce rules to prevent restrictions on the import and use of commercial encryption technologies.
Lower all barriers to foreign direct investment.
Implement an expansion of the EU-U.S. procurement commitments.
Outlaw the use of forced offsets.
End government production subsidies to areas of innovative trade, like aerospace.
Clarify the scope and coverage of national treatment in the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), explicitly subjecting state-influenced entities to a robust national treatment obligation.
Enshrine 12 years of data exclusivity for biopharmaceutical products.
Adopt a common definition for trade secrets: any information that has economic value (actual or potential), is not generally known to the public, and for which the trade secret owner has taken reasonable measures to keep private.
Establish a bilateral R&D participation model in order to coordinate cross-border pre-competitive research partnerships.
Allow companies participating in pre-competitive research to freely transfer ownership and access rights for foundational IP to affiliates across and between the European Union and the United States.

Eliminate all tariffs in trade on innovation industries.

Liberalize trade in innovative services, especially telecommunication services and audiovisual services.

Create transparent, science-based regulatory regimes in the pharmaceutical, automotive and agricultural sectors.

Prohibit the use of data center localization as a condition of market access.

Honor existing international data flow agreements, such as the Safe Harbor.

Introduce rules to prevent restrictions on the import and use of commercial encryption technologies.

Lower all barriers to foreign direct investment.

Implement an expansion of the EU-U.S. procurement commitments.

Outlaw the use of forced offsets.

End government production subsidies to areas of innovative trade, like aerospace.

Clarify the scope and coverage of national treatment in the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), explicitly subjecting state-influenced entities to a robust national treatment obligation.

Enshrine 12 years of data exclusivity for biopharmaceutical products.

Adopt a common definition for trade secrets: any information that has economic value (actual or potential), is not generally known to the public, and for which the trade secret owner has taken reasonable measures to keep private.

Establish a bilateral R&D participation model in order to coordinate cross-border pre-competitive research partnerships.

Allow companies participating in pre-competitive research to freely transfer ownership and access rights for foundational IP to affiliates across and between the European Union and the United States.

Download policy recommendations.