Science and R&D

In an economy powered by innovation and technology, more proactive R&D policies are key to success.

Boost R&D by Easing Repatriation Rules

January 12, 2015
| Blogs & Op-eds

A policy compromise that lets companies repatriate funds at a low tax rate, provided they spent at least half of these funds on research and development, would accomplish the mutual goals of freeing up foreign earnings and boosting research, while not contributing to the federal debt-to-GDP ratio.

New Evidence from Canada: Tax Policy Does Affect Research Spending

December 15, 2014
| Blogs & Op-eds

In “Do Tax Credits Affect R&D Expenditures for Small Firms? Evidence from Canada,” the authors find that firms that qualified for a larger tax credit did spend more on R&D in the following years compared to firms of similar income whose tax situation did not change. 

Congress Should Make the R&D Tax Credit Permanent

December 2, 2014
| Blogs & Op-eds

Congress has an opportunity now to permanently extend the research and development (R&D) tax credit, an essential tool for promoting innovation, competitiveness and economic growth. While neither the timing nor the substance of the proposed legislation is perfect, Congress and the president should take action this year. Although it would be preferable to treat this business provision on its own, political realities dictate that Congress should take the best deal that it can and make the credit permanent now.

How the Silicon Valley Innovation Ecosystem Creates Success

November 30, 2014
| Presentations

Silicon Valley boasts perhaps the most unique, difficult-to-replicate regional innovation ecosystem in the world. The presentation explores five key characteristics that make Silicon Valley so distinct: 1) its five world-class research universities, five U.S. national laboratories, and dozens of world-class corporate and private research institutions; 2) a half-century of intense federal R&D investment; 3) 40 percent of U.S. venture capital invested and seven of America’s top ten VC investors; 4) 6 of the world’s top 10 ICT companies located with a ten-square-mile radius; and 5) a concentration of both advanced-degree holders and foreign-born start-up founders more than twice the national average. The presentation  also explains how companies in the Valley are different, particularly that they use a “need-seeker” strategy that strives to address unarticulated needs and seeks to be first-to-market with the resulting new products and services.

Defense Innovation and the Future of American Competitiveness

The Challenges for America’s Defense Innovation

November 21, 2014
| Reports

 

From WWII to the 1957 launch of the Soviet Sputnik to the 1980s defense buildup, U.S. defense investments in research and development not only promoted American security and safety but made a major contribution to U.S. innovation and economic leadership, assisting in the development of a host of industry-defining technologies from the Internet to GPS to the laser. Yet since the end of Cold War, federal funding for R&D, including defense R&D, has increased much more gradually and recently has actually declined. In addition, the 2013 sequestration – which mandated automatic spending cuts numerous programs including defense research initiatives – has exacerbated the challenge.
This report takes a closer look at America’s defense innovation ecosystem, assessing the current state of U.S. military expenditures compared to historical averages and our international competitors. It then analyzes the impact of the sequestration and limited budgets, the decline of the industrial base for defense needs, and the erosion of domestic innovation generally on the health of the defense research enterprise. The United States defense system is still the most innovative in the world, but that leadership is not assured and is in danger of failing. This decline in leadership will not only impact defense innovation and capabilities, but also overall commercial innovation and U.S. competitiveness.

 

From WWII to the 1957 launch of the Soviet Sputnik to the 1980s defense buildup, U.S. defense investments in research and development not only promoted American security and safety but made a major contribution to U.S. innovation and economic leadership, assisting in the development of a host of industry-defining technologies from the Internet to GPS to the laser. Yet since the end of Cold War, federal funding for R&D, including defense R&D, has increased much more gradually and recently has actually declined. In addition, the 2013 sequestration – which mandated automatic spending cuts numerous programs including defense research initiatives – has exacerbated the challenge.

This report takes a closer look at America’s defense innovation ecosystem, assessing the current state of U.S. military expenditures compared to historical averages and our international competitors. It then analyzes the impact of the sequestration and limited budgets, the decline of the industrial base for defense needs, and the erosion of domestic innovation generally on the health of the defense research enterprise. The United States defense system is still the most innovative in the world, but that leadership is not assured and is in danger of failing. This decline in leadership will not only impact defense innovation and capabilities, but also overall commercial innovation and U.S. competitiveness.

GOP Takeover in Congress Could Bode Ill for Supercomputing and Science

Computer World
Republican control will raise questions about support for the tech economy through funding of science and research, education and training.

After Election 2014: R&D Tax Credit

Science
The U.S. ranks 27th, out of 42 nations, in the generosity of our R&D tax credit.

Next-Generation R&D Partnerships: The NCATS Success Story

October 29, 2014 - 10:00am - 11:30am
Rayburn House Office Building
45 Independence Ave SW
2168
Washington
DC
20515

A major challenge for federally funded research and technology is bridging the so-called "valley of death" - a state of development where many promising discoveries die because they are not sufficiently advanced to attract private sector partners or venture funding even though they may have tremendous potential impact. Read more »

Next-Generation R&D Partnerships: The NCATS Success Story

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