Privacy

Surveillance Cameras: Helpful or Harmful?

ITIF Praises Obama Administration for Selection of Senior Privacy Official

Caught on Camera: The Inconsistency of Privacy Advocates on Surveillance Technology

April 23, 2013
| Blogs & Op-eds

ITIF Senior Analyst Daniel Castro notes that privacy advocates who have opposed the use of surveillance cameras have tried to change their talking points in the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombing. For years these advocates have lobbied for stricter rules on the use of surveillance cameras that limit their effectiveness, and then later try to claim that this means these systems are not useful. Moreover, until now, these privacy advocates have consistently denied any public value from surveillance cameras, and now that this argument has been lost, they are retreating to other tired claims. In this article, Castro refutes those claims and calls out privacy groups like ACLU, EPIC, and EFF for their attempts to disguise ideological opposition to surveillance cameras as a rational debate about cost and effectiveness.

ITIF Criticizes Privacy Advocates for Past Statements on Surveillance Cameras

In an article posted this morning, ITIF Senior Analyst Daniel Castro notes that privacy advocates who have opposed the use of surveillance cameras have tried to change their talking points in the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombing. Read more »

Congress should Reform the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) to ensure that citizens have a right to privacy for their electronic data whether it is stored at home on a device or remotely in the cloud.

ECPA was enacted in 1986 and has not kept pace with the advancement of technology. For example, there are different levels of protection afforded to the privacy of an individual’s data based on where the data is stored and how long the data has been stored. Where possible, the privacy of an individual’s communication should be the same regardless of the type of technology that is used to facilitate this communication.

Report: More Youth Use Smartphones as Route to Web

The Miami Herald
According to Daniel Castro, too many adults don't fully understand how the smartphones work - or how their kids might use them differently than they do.

Will Congress Unfriend Mark Zuckerberg?

Mother Jones
Daniel Castro examines the reintroduction of the "Do Not Track" bill.

The Cost of Privacy: Netflix – Three Years & Three-Quarters of a Million Dollars

March 13, 2013
| Blogs & Op-eds

Today, Netflix announced a new feature—“Netflix Social”—which lets users share the TV shows and movies they watch on Netflix with their friends on Facebook. This was made possible because of an update to a privacy law. In this blog, ITIF Senior Analyst Daniel Castro argues that this is a clear example of how privacy laws can stall innovation. In this case, the cost of privacy was approximately three years and three-quarter of a million dollars.

The FTC’s Top Consumer Priority Should be Identity Theft

March 7, 2013
| Blogs & Op-eds

As Commissioner Ramirez begins her new term, senior analyst Daniel Castro encourages her to consider how the FTC can be more effective at making meaningful progress in addressing identity theft, such as through better use of technology. By building on its previous efforts, the FTC can reduce the financial pain and inconveniences incurred by the practice and better address the needs of American consumers.