Privacy

Tangled Data Protection Laws Threaten Cloud, Critics Say

InformationWeek
ITIF calls for "Geneva Convention" to address complex maze of data laws that affect growth of cloud computing and global trade.

Government Snooping and E-Surveillance Call for a Geneva Convention for Data

December 18, 2013
| Blogs & Op-eds

Electronic government surveillance has become a tool of modern conflicts, used, often indiscriminately, to spy on enemy combatants, foreign corporations and individuals, and domestic citizens alike, often with little restraint from domestic laws and even less regard for international ones.  In the process, legitimate companies trying to provide innovative information technology products and services to their customers are facing demands from governments around the world to pervert their offerings for the sake of intelligence gathering. This environment requires the creation of international standards governing the collection of data to protect privacy and preserve the continued growth of the digital economy.

Cloud Use Complicated by Data Security Laws

Wall Street Journal
ITIF calls for a “Geneva Convention on Data” to address conflicts over electronic surveillance.

Tech Firms Vie to Protect Personal Data, Profits

ABCNews.com
"The entire tech industry has been implicated and is now facing a global backlash," says Daniel Castro.

Silicon Valley warns NSA surveillance poses threat to overseas growth

The Hill
American tech companies are caught between the U.S. government’s demands for user data and foreign countries’ demands for user protections.

Google, Apple among Tech Giants to Tell US: Limit Spying

December 10, 2013
ReutersTV notes that the PRISM revelations could cost U.S. cloud providers $35 billion over the next three years, based on ITIF estimates.

ReutersTV notes that the PRISM revelations could cost U.S. cloud providers $35 billion over the next three years, based on ITIF estimates.

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The Continued Impact of Spam on the Digital Economy

Microsoft Cranks Up Security to Lock Out Government Spies

E-Commerce Times
Microsoft's encryption plan is a reaction to questions from their customers about what can be done to secure their data, says Daniel Castro.