Intellectual Property

It's Our Pirate Party, We Can Do What We Want

October 15, 2013
| Blogs & Op-eds

If we want the U.S. movie and television industry to continue to produce the most innovative and creative content around the world, then we need to be willing to pay for it, just like we pay for our cars, our phones and our computers. 

How to Craft an Innovation Maximizing T-TIP Agreement

October 10, 2013
| Reports

The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (T-TIP) Agreement should be designed to maximize innovation in the United States and the European Union. Innovation is a central driver of economic growth, and thus a key focal point of U.S. and EU economic development strategies. Ideally, the T-TIP would eliminate all tariffs and non-tariff barriers to trade. However, realistically, both the European Union and the United States are going to make trade-offs, and it is important to make these trade-offs in a manner that promotes innovation-based trade as a fundamental driver of global growth. 

Policy Recommendations:

Eliminate all tariffs in trade on innovation industries.
Liberalize trade in innovative services, especially telecommunication services and audiovisual services.
Create transparent, science-based regulatory regimes in the pharmaceutical, automotive and agricultural sectors.
Prohibit the use of data center localization as a condition of market access.
Honor existing international data flow agreements, such as the Safe Harbor.
Introduce rules to prevent restrictions on the import and use of commercial encryption technologies.
Lower all barriers to foreign direct investment.
Implement an expansion of the EU-U.S. procurement commitments.
Outlaw the use of forced offsets.
End government production subsidies to areas of innovative trade, like aerospace.
Clarify the scope and coverage of national treatment in the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), explicitly subjecting state-influenced entities to a robust national treatment obligation.
Enshrine 12 years of data exclusivity for biopharmaceutical products.
Adopt a common definition for trade secrets: any information that has economic value (actual or potential), is not generally known to the public, and for which the trade secret owner has taken reasonable measures to keep private.
Establish a bilateral R&D participation model in order to coordinate cross-border pre-competitive research partnerships.
Allow companies participating in pre-competitive research to freely transfer ownership and access rights for foundational IP to affiliates across and between the European Union and the United States.

Eliminate all tariffs in trade on innovation industries.

Liberalize trade in innovative services, especially telecommunication services and audiovisual services.

Create transparent, science-based regulatory regimes in the pharmaceutical, automotive and agricultural sectors.

Prohibit the use of data center localization as a condition of market access.

Honor existing international data flow agreements, such as the Safe Harbor.

Introduce rules to prevent restrictions on the import and use of commercial encryption technologies.

Lower all barriers to foreign direct investment.

Implement an expansion of the EU-U.S. procurement commitments.

Outlaw the use of forced offsets.

End government production subsidies to areas of innovative trade, like aerospace.

Clarify the scope and coverage of national treatment in the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), explicitly subjecting state-influenced entities to a robust national treatment obligation.

Enshrine 12 years of data exclusivity for biopharmaceutical products.

Adopt a common definition for trade secrets: any information that has economic value (actual or potential), is not generally known to the public, and for which the trade secret owner has taken reasonable measures to keep private.

Establish a bilateral R&D participation model in order to coordinate cross-border pre-competitive research partnerships.

Allow companies participating in pre-competitive research to freely transfer ownership and access rights for foundational IP to affiliates across and between the European Union and the United States.

Download policy recommendations.

Why America Gets Copyright Correct and (Some) Libertarians Do Not

October 3, 2013
| Blogs & Op-eds

Innovation economics holds that a key goal of copyright is to enable a healthy production system that includes not only productivity, quality and innovation, but also national competitiveness. It is this type of system that will create the ability to produce higher quality and more innovative content, not one in which the creators aren’t able to be fairly compensated for their work.

The Size and Shape of Online Piracy

September 17, 2013 - 9:00am - 10:30am
Russell Senate Office Building
Constitution Ave. NE and 1st Street NE
Room 485
Washington
DC
20002

As ITIF has demonstrated, the Internet has been a key driver of global growth while also providing consumers with vastly more choice and convenience.  But it also has enabled the growth of piracy of digital content. Read more »

Declaration Supporting Incentives for Medical Innovation

September 17, 2013
| Testimony and Filings

ITIF joined with a host of national and regional non-profits to call for the development of stronger incentives and intellectual property protections to enhance global medical innovation. ITIF served as a lead signor of the Declaration, along with the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association. It was delivered to President Barack Obama and Congressional leaders of both parties. 

IP Protections and Innovation

July 29, 2013
In an interview with KNEW-AM, San Francisco, Robert Atkinson discusses the importance of including strong intellectual property protections in the Trans Pacific Partnership trade negotiations.

In an interview with KNEW-AM, San Francisco, Robert Atkinson discusses the importance of including strong intellectual property protections in the Trans Pacific Partnership trade negotiations. 

Brazil ranks 32nd in the world in the number of resident patents granted.

The Brazilian government must introduce policy reforms that will spur domestic innovation and entrepreneurship. A key area of focus should be the nation's outdated patent system. Currently it takes 5 to 8 years to be granted a patent in Brazil compared to an average of 3 years in the United States.

GAO Report on Economic Impact from IP Theft Underwhelms

July 12, 2013
| Blogs & Op-eds

Aggressive foreign IP theft harms firms and workers in the United States and the overall U.S. economy. It is high-time that the federal government makes it readily apparent that IP theft will be punished systematically and significantly.

Attorney General Asks for More Tools to Combat IP Infringement

May 16, 2013
| Blogs & Op-eds

Without new legislation, the Department of Justice can only bring misdemeanor charges against criminals and terrorists engaged in widespread, for-profit online streaming.

Should Government Regulate Illicit Uses of 3D Printing?

May 16, 2013
| Reports

3D printing is an important technology that introduces new risks for public safety and intellectual property rights. Although 3D printing opens up new practical challenges, especially around enforcement, the policy questions for 3D printer