Intellectual Property

New Year's Resolution: Stop Stealing to Save American Jobs

January 6, 2010
| Blogs & Op-eds

With December’s poor employment numbers, creating jobs is on everyone’s mind in Washington; yet one area for reform, digital piracy, is constantly overlooked.  In this Huffington Post blog, ITIF Senior Analyst Daniel Castro outlines why digital theft is too often not taken seriously and how piracy impacts the U.S. economy.

Steal These Policies: Strategies for Combating Digital Piracy

December 15, 2009 - 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Information Technology and Innovation Foundation
1101 K Street NW
610A
Washington
DC
20005

ITIF discusses a report documenting the current state of digital piracy and describing how innovative technology such as content identification can be used to reduce piracy. This report also outlines strategies for policymakers to combat this problem and calls for more proactive government involvement in reducing piracy. Read more »

Steal These Policies: Strategies for Combating Digital Piracy

December 15, 2009
Video and audio from the event "Steal These Policies: Strategies for Combating Digital Piracy."

In this event, participants discuss a new report documenting the current state of digital piracy and describing how innovative technology such as content identification can be used to reduce piracy. The report also outlines strategies for policymakers to combat this problem and call for more proactive government involvement in reducing piracy.

See video

Steal These Policies: Strategies for Reducing Digital Piracy

December 15, 2009
| Reports

It is time for the U.S. government to take global theft of U.S. intellectual property, especially digital content, much more seriously. A new ITIF report finds that the U.S. government can and should do more to support industry efforts to reduce digital piracy, a growing problem that threatens not only the robust production of digital content, but U.S. jobs. While there are no “silver bullets” to reducing digital piracy, there are a number of “lead bullets” that can and should be implemented. Specifically, ITIF calls on the federal government to not preclude those impacted by digital piracy, including copyright holders and ISPs, from taking steps, including implementing technical controls like digital fingerprinting, to reduce piracy. In addition, industry and government should consider bold steps to limit the revenue streams of those profiting from piracy by encouraging ISPs, search engines, ad networks and credit card companies to block piracy websites and refuse to do business with them. These options should be part of a broad dialogue that engages all stakeholders, including government, content owners, website operators, technology developers, and ISPs and other intermediaries, on how to improve the global response to piracy. Toward that end, this report recommends that policymakers:

  • Support, rather than impede, anti-piracy innovation, including the development of new technical means.
  • Encourage coordinated industry action to take steps to fight digital piracy, such as ISP implementation of graduated response systems.
  • More actively pursue international frameworks and action to protect intellectual property, including digital content.

Video Blog: America Has Much to Learn About Digital Piracy

November 18, 2009

The US loses about $20 billion a year on pirated software, movies, and music. But public policy can help stem the tide of digital theft. For example, France has recently passed a 'three strikes and you’re out' law, whereby if after two warning letters an individual continues to download pirated software then his Internet access will be cut off. US policy makers should consider adopting similar policies.

Combating Unfair Trade Practices in the Innovation Economy

May 22, 2008
| Testimony and Filings

In testimony before the Senate Finance Committee, ITIF President Rob Atkinson described the growing array of mercantilist trade policies that nations have enacted to unfairly disadvantage foreign – including U.S. – technology products. This new wave of protectionism, which is designed to unfairly erode U.S. technology leadership, includes a range of policies – from discriminatory taxes and tariffs to efforts to block market access – that run counter to the spirit of mutually-beneficial free trade. To combat these practices, Atkinson expressed support for the Trade Enforcement Act of 2007 currently under consideration, and argued further for the enactment of a 25 percent tax credit for corporate expenditures related to bringing WTO cases to fight mercantilist practices. Stronger trade enforcement promises not only to help American workers and firms, but also ensures that the United States continues to lead the world in supporting an international free trade regime that will bring robust and sustainable prosperity, both domestically and abroad.

Copyright, Content and Class Action Lawsuits: A Debate on the Google Book Search Settlement

April 21, 2009 - 2:00pm - 3:30pm
The Library of Congress, Thomas Jefferson Building
LJ 162
Washington, DC
20005

When Google began its initiative in 2004 to digitize 15 million books within a decade from university and public libraries, the project was met with immediate resistance by some authors and publishers who objected to the decision to include books still protected under copyright. Read more »

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