Intellectual Property

And the Winner Is...

March 4, 2011
| Blogs & Op-eds

Increasing copyright infringement should be recognized as a global problem, not just because it happens in every country, but because in a global economy, the losses will be shared by many. The USTR's "Out-Of-Cycle Review of Notorious Markets" should serve as a reminder to every country that contributes to the creative economy that they have a stake in protecting intellectual property. It should also remind Congress that one reason they should take action domestically is because too little is being done by our international partners and, at least for the near future, we have the most to lose.

ITIF Urges Senate Action to Combat Digital Piracy

In written testimony submitted to the Senate Judiciary Committee, ITIF Senior Analyst Daniel Castro made the case for balanced but aggressive action to combat online piracy. Read more »

Pirated Content Almost 25% of Internet Traffic

The Washington Times
Rob Atkinson explains how bandwidth-clogging pirated content imposes a "tax" on all Americans.

Online Piracy Remains Intractable Without Government Action

January 31, 2011 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm
The District of Columbia Bar
1101 K Street NW
100
Washington
DC
20005

Online piracy is responsible for a significant portion of network traffic on the Internet, but just how much bandwidth is consumed by illegal file sharing? Read more »

Online Piracy Remains Intractable Without Government Action

January 31, 2011
| Blogs & Op-eds

This Innovation Policy Blog post presents an overview of a study released by Envisional benchmarking the amount of broadband used for online piracy. The findings show that one out of four bits on the Internet is infringing content. How much bigger will piracy need to get before policymakers realize this is a problem?

Online Piracy Remains Intractable Without Government Action

January 31, 2011
Multimedia from the event, "How Much Bandwidth Is Used For Online Piracy?"

Online piracy is responsible for a significant portion of network traffic on the Internet, but just how much bandwidth is consumed by illegal file sharing? Various studies over the past year from network monitoring companies have given us a clearer picture of overall Internet usage and traffic patterns, but the exact amount of traffic attributable to infringing content has been difficult to estimate. Read more »

See video

China’s Reverse Robin Hood: Stealing Intellectual Property from the Poor

January 19, 2011
| Blogs & Op-eds

Some advocates of developing countries contend that too often intellectual property law enforcement keeps developing countries from acquiring drugs or other IP-based technologies critical to overcoming barriers to growth. Some go so far as to say that tough IP laws are nothing more than a sinister way to keep rich countries rich and let poor countries stay poor. China is among the countries that argue that they are poor and that technology transfer (much of it forced or stolen) is an integral part of their development strategy. Yet Chinese firms steal IP not only from rich nations, but also from countries far poorer. In this post, Scott Andes reports from Ghana on how China's IP theft hurts the poor.

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