Health IT

Health IT issues.

Medical Data Innovation: Building the Foundations of a Health Information Economy

May 3, 2011 - 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Information Technology and Innovation Foundation
1101 K Street NW
Suite 610A
Washington
DC
20005

On April 26, 2011, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in IMS Health v. Sorrell, a case that will decide whether state laws that restrict the use of prescriber-identified data violate the First Amendment protections of free speech. This case will have important implications for how health data will be used for medical research, patient education, marketing, and health care reform. Read more »

Medical Data Innovation: Building the Foundations of a Health Information Economy

May 3, 2011
Video and audio from the event.

On April 26, 2011, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in IMS Health v. Sorrell, a case that will decide whether state laws that restrict the use of prescriber-identified data violate the First Amendment protections of free speech. This case will have important implications for how health data will be used for medical research, patient education, marketing, and health care reform. Do laws that burden or ban the use of de-identified data for marketing purposes also impede medical research? Read more »

See video

Do Not Track for Doctors vs. Do Not Track for Consumers

May 2, 2011
| Blogs & Op-eds

How does the recent Supreme Court case on medical privacy relate to the online privacy debate?

Health-Care Investment—The Hidden Crisis

The Wall Street Journal
Michael Milken references ITIF's report, "The Atlantic Century," in calling for increased government investment in biomedical R&D.

Medical Innovation at a Crossroads: Choosing the Path Ahead

January 12, 2011
| Presentations

This event will examine how the U.S. can best foster investment in medical innovation as a way to reclaim our global competiveness, position the nation as a true global leader, and bend the cost curve to reduce health care costs and thus the deficit – all while finding treatments and cures for the most devastating of diseases. Rob Atkinson will be participating in this event.

What States Need from Federal Policy on Medical Innovation to Compete in the Global Marketplace

January 12, 2011
| Presentations

Rob Atkinson participated on the "What States Need from Federal Policy on Medical Innovation to Compete in the Global Marketplace" panel at Council for American Medical Innovation Event, Medical Innovatino at a Crossroads: Choosing the Path Ahead. Other panelists were Dick Gephardt, Former House Majority Leader, Co-Chair of CAMI, Chris Coburn, Executive Director, Cleveland Clinic Innovations, John Castellani, President and CEO, PhRMA and the panel was moderated by Katty Kay, Washington Correspondent, BBC World News America and Co-author, Womenomics.

Congress should enact legislation to establish health record data banks.

Independent Health Record Trust Act introduced by Rep. Moore (D-KS) and Rep. Ryan (R-WI), for example, would establish federally regulated health record data banks. This legislation establishes a fiduciary duty for each health record data bank to act for the benefit of its participants and prescribes penalties for a breach of these responsibilities. In addition, the bill prohibits the data bank operators from charging fees to health care providers for accessing or updating an EHR to which they have been given access. The legislation specifically states that all participation in the health record data bank is voluntary, and no entity, including employer, health insurance issuer or health care provider can compel participation.

To help patients access their health records more easily, Congress should require doctors to provide patients with an electronic copy of their health information upon request.

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) established the right for individuals to obtain a paper copy of their health care records from their doctors. Congress should update this legislation to require doctors to provide patients with an electronic copy of their health information upon request. Under the current law, health care providers can charge reasonable fees associated with the cost of copying and mailing paper health care records, but they cannot charge fees for the time spent searching for or retrieving the records. We propose establishing a threshold date after which patients will no longer be charged for electronic copies of their health records. created after the threshold date. Patients would be charged only for paper records from before this date. This mandate would protect patients’ right of access to their medical information while also providing an economic incentive for medical practices to move to EHRs.

Leading Innovations in Healthcare Technology

July 22, 2010 - 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Rayburn House Office Building
Independence Avenue and South Capitol Street
Room 2226
Washington
DC
20003