Health IT

Health IT issues.

Who's a Health IT "Luddite?"

Politico
ITIF's Luddite Awards highlight EFF's misguided opposition to electronic health records.

Data-Driven Medicine in the Age of Genomics

December 11, 2014 - 9:00am - 3:45pm
Reserve Officers Association
1 Constitution Avenue Northeast
Washington
DC
20002

Special guest Senator Michael Bennet (D-Colorado) will deliver keynote remarks. Read more »

GOP Sweep: Opportunity for Fresh Start for Health IT

Politico
A Republican Senate will likely favor a voluntary risk framework rooted in an industry-led approach, says Daniel Castro.

In 2013, 1 billion prescriptions, or 58 percent of all prescriptions, were routed electronically.

E-prescribing cuts medical transaction costs by eliminating the need for confirmation phone calls and faxes, and reduces health risks associated with prescription delays. In 2004, over half of states had legislation banning e-prescribing. Read more »

ATA: Telemedicine Meant to Supplement, Not 'Totally Replace' In-person Care

FierceHealthIT
ITIF has called for the creation of national telemedicine guidelines including setting a standard definition and establishing a single, federal licensure for providers.

Congress should establish a single, national license for telehealth providers

To address this challenge and further enhance development of telehealth services, Congress should establish a single, national license for telehealth providers.

Group Urges Congress to Make Telehealth Mandatory

Government Health IT
ITIF issues a call for congressional action to spur expansion of telehealth services.

Telehealth Deployment Is Too Slow, Report Says

Roll Call
Imagine being able to video conference with your doctor without having to leave your home.

Congress should establish a single, national license for telehealth providers.

State licensing boards establish the conditions under which health care providers may practice within their state. In general, states require practitioners to be licensed in the state in which they practice medicine. Before the advent of telehealth, the state where practitioners worked and the state where patients received treatment were almost always the same. However, since telehealth allows practitioners and patients to be located in different locations—a patient in Florida may want to seek treatment from a doctor in New York—this condition is no longer necessarily true. This has raised legal challenges for providers wishing to provide telehealth services as the rules for licensing vary by jurisdiction. In addition, since health care providers cannot practice medicine without a proper license, a telehealth provider would potentially have to obtain a separate license for every state. These legal complexities create a costly and cumbersome process that impairs the widespread adoption of telehealth. To address this challenge and further enhance development of telehealth services, Congress should establish a single, national license for telehealth providers.

Group Pushes Congress to Regulate Telehealth

The Hill
Conflicting federal regulations and state laws have created barriers to effective implementation of telehealth nationally.
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