Energy & Climate

Energy-related issues.

Can Solar Energy Save The World?

October 31, 2013
| Blogs & Op-eds

Arguing in The Economist, Matthew Stepp says solar energy can play a role in addressing significant global problems like climate change, and in many ways it must, but with one big caveat: we have to drive innovation to make it cheaper and better. If we don't, solar has little chance of "saving the world."

Utility 2.0: Building the Next-Gen Electric Grid through Innovation

October 29, 2013 - 9:30am - 11:00am
Information Technology and Innovation Foundation
1101 K St. NW
610 A
Washington
DC
20005

Developing and deploying smart grid technologies is fundamentally important to building infrastructure resilience, growing the clean economy, and increasing U.S. productivity. But like many national challenges, there are a number of technological, institutional, and regulatory issues standing in the way of progress. Read more »

Utility 2.0: Building the Next-Gen Electric Grid through Innovation

October 29, 2013
A diverse panel of experts will discuss: What innovative technologies are advancing the smart grid? How can policy accelerate this transition? Does America need a Utility 2.0?

Developing and deploying smart grid technologies is fundamentally important to building infrastructure resilience, growing the clean economy, and increasing U.S. productivity. But like many national challenges, there are a number of technological, institutional, and regulatory issues standing in the way of progress. There’s no one stakeholder, public or private, that can singlehandedly implement the smart grid. Nonetheless, grid technology innovations are beginning to disrupt the system, with consequences to consumers, utilities, regulators, and policymakers. Read more »

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In 2012, 12% Of Utility-Scale Electricity In The U.S. Came from Renewable Sources

In 2012 renewable energy generated about 12 percent of total utility-scale electricity in the United States, and 19.5 percent of globally generated electricity. While the share of renewable energy resources in the electricity market is growing, the high costs of most clean technologies pose a challenge for further renewable penetration. New policies and investments are required to enhance the American energy innovation ecosystem to develop renewable energy technologies that are cost, and performance, competitive with fossil fuels.

Don’t Extend the Wind Production Tax Credit. Fix it

MIT Technology Review
ITIF argues the PTC should be tied to specific cost and performance improvements that lead to improved innovation

Challenging the Clean Energy Deployment Consensus

Utility 2.0: Building the Next-Gen Electric Grid through Innovation

More ‘Innovation’ Key to Low-Carbon Energy, ITIF Says

Politico
The best way to boost clean energy and address climate change is not by pushing for subsidies or a price on carbon, but rather by instituting a robust, global clean energy innovation strategy.

Rush to deploy clean energy tech is costly recipe for failure – report

Greenwire
The push to rapidly deploy existing clean energy technology, instead of focusing on energy innovation, is misguided.

Challenging the Clean Energy Deployment Consensus

October 23, 2013 - 9:00am - 10:30am
Information Technology and Innovation Foundation
1101 K Street, NW
610 A
Washington
DC
20005

A majority of clean energy advocates believe that the world has all the low-carbon technologies it needs to address climate change; what we lack is the political will to mandate and subsidize their deployment. To support this view advocates of this “Clean Energy Deployment Consensus” point to a number of studies assessing the technical readiness of clean energy technologies. Read more »

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