Education & Training

The use of IT in education. This is not for STEM issues.

Why the Current STEM Education Reform Strategy Won’t Work

April 11, 2012
| Reports

In an article for the National Academy's Issues in Science and Technology, Rob Atkinson argued that much of what passes for accepted wisdom for STEM reform (science, technology, engineering and math education) is misguided and that we need a new approach. Advocates of what can be called the "Some STEM for All" framework want an approach focused largely on expanding and improving K-12 STEM education for all American students. Many of the dominant policy solutions being proposed, such as increased teacher pay and campaigns to get students interested in science, reflect this framing. In contrast, Atkinson argues for a new approach grounded in a "Some STEM for All" approach focused in part on providing high quality STEM education for students especially interested in and focused on STEM.

Transforming Higher Education with IT

March 28, 2012 - 9:00am - 10:30am
Information Technology and Innovation Foundation
1101 K Street NW
Suite 610A
Washington
DC
20005

President Obama recently announced a new initiative to address the question of higher education affordability. For decades, the cost of college has been growing faster than inflation, putting college out of reach for an increasing number of American families. Read more »

Transforming Higher Education with IT

March 28, 2012
Exploring what can be done at multiple levels to improve productivity in higher education.

President Obama recently announced a new initiative to address the question of higher education affordability. For decades, the cost of college has been growing faster than inflation, putting college out of reach for an increasing number of American families. However, if we are going to keep college cost increases down, information technology will have to play a key role, just as it has in a host of other industries. Read more »

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Even in the current recession, states like New Mexico are reporting too few of their residents are trained to fill their largest job category, namely middle-skill jobs (49 percent of jobs in this category vs. 45 percent workers).

If we want to emerge more vigorously from the recent recession and loosing the race for global innovation and competitiveness, we need to commit to investing in the "four Ts" of innovation: trade, taxes, technology and talent. Investing in talent means more than simply spending more money. It requires rethinking how students learn and how to best nurture their talents and interests. As important as math and science are, not everyone is cut out to work in laboratory or do research. Read more »

So few high school students were taking the AP Computer Science AB exam that it was discontinued in 2009.

For the past thirty years, computing has been at the heart of the global innovation revolution, creating entire new industries, transforming existing industries into productive powerhouses, and changing the face of culture across the globe. Computing is driving innovation in existing fields of science and creating entirely new ones. Underlying this revolution is the discipline of computer science. Paradoxically, as the role and significance of computing has increased in society and the economy, quality computer science education in the U.S. K-12 education system is on the decline. Read more »

The U.S. ranks 25th out of 27 countries in the growth of college-aged adults with college degrees over the last decade.

Low PISA (Program of International Student Assessment) scores and other international metrics are often drawn upon to highlight the United States' lackluster standing in higher education rankings. However, what is not discussed often enough is that the U.S. education system isn't just poor--it's getting worse. Between 1999 and 2008 the number of college-aged adults (25-34) with tertiary degrees grew slower than 25 out of 27 countries studied.

If the United States were able to close the gap between its educational achievement levels and those of better-performing nations such as Finland and Korea, U.S. GDP could be as much as $1.3 trillion to $2.3 trillion higher.

A series of McKinsey Global Institute reports find that a lack of innovation and productivity growth in four critical sectors--education, health care, government, and national infrastructure--are holding back broader economic growth. Read more »

University Research Funding: The United States is Behind and Falling

May 19, 2011
| Reports
In 2008, the United States ranked 22nd out of 30 countries in government-funded university research and 21st in business-funded university research. Not only does the United States lag behind other countries, but we are falling even farther behind. From 2000 to 2008, the United States ranked 18th in the growth of government-funded university research, with countries like China, Korea and the United Kingdom significantly outperforming the United States. Worse still, the United States ranked 23rd in the growth of business-funded research, with it actually declining as a share of GDP. In contrast, collaboration between universities and business grew dramatically in nations like Austria, China, Israel and Taiwan. Of course, there is a remedy. Instead of across-the-board budget cutting at the state and national levels, policymakers can target university research for increased funding and enact a collaborative R&D tax credit that provides companies with a more generous tax credit for expenditures made on research conducted at universities.

Research and development drives innovation and innovation drives long-run economic growth, creating jobs and improving living standards in the process. University-based research is of particular importance to innovation, as the early-stage research that is typically performed at universities serves to expand the knowledge pool from which the private sector draws ideas and innovation. As such, it is troubling that in 2008 the United States ranked 22nd out of 30 countries in government-funded university research and 21st in business-funded university research. Moreover, we are falling even farther behind.

From 2000 to 2008, the United States ranked 18th in the growth of government-funded university research, with countries like China, Korea and the United Kingdom significantly outperforming the United States. Worse still, the United States ranked 23rd in the growth of business-funded research, with it actually declining as a share of GDP. In contrast, collaboration between universities and business grew dramatically in nations like Austria, China, Israel and Taiwan. These statistics are unmistakable and troubling. As we fail to increase these investments in our future at anywhere near the rate of our economic competitors, our innovation system is faltering. National economies increasingly compete on the basis of innovation, and, in the race for global innovation advantage, the United States will continue to trail countries that have placed university research and industrial collaboration at the forefront of their economic policy.

While our public research universiti