Data Innovation

Data and Privacy: Identification, De-Identification, and Re-Identification

September 17, 2014
| Presentations

Daniel Castro will present on the panel “Data and Privacy: Identification, De-Identification, and Re-Identification” at the 2014 Global Identity Summit. 

The Public Data Revolution: Where We’ve Been, Where We’re Heading

September 16, 2014
| Presentations

Daniel Castro will speak at the Association of Public Data Users 2014 Annual Conference on “The Public Data Revolution: Where We’ve Been, Where We’re Heading.”

Big Data and Privacy Frameworks: Perspectives from Government, Industry and Policy Experts

September 11, 2014
| Presentations

Daniel Castro will participate in the American Bar Association webinar “Big Data and Privacy Frameworks: Perspectives from Government, Industry and Policy Experts.”

Data for Social Justice: The Impact of Data on Underserved Communities

September 10, 2014 - 9:00am - 10:30am
Center for Data Innovation
1101 K Street, NW
610 A
Washington
DC
20005

Data-driven innovation promises to deliver a wide array of social and economic benefits from better and more affordable health care to improvements in education. But how can we ensure that the riches of the data “gold rush” are shared by all members of society? Read more »

Six States Score Best in New Open Data Report

StateScoop
States creating new open data policies or portals, or refreshing old ones, have many opportunities to learn from the experiences of early adopters.

These States Are Making the Most Open-Data Progress

Government Executive
Hawaii and Illinois lead an open data policy ranking produced by the Center for Data Innovation.

What’s Your State’s Open Data Score?

Roll Call
By making government data more accessible, state governments can foster data-driven innovation in both the public and private sectors.

State Open Data Policies and Portals

August 18, 2014
| Reports

This report by the Center for Data Innovation provides a snapshot of states’ efforts to create open data policies and portals and ranks states on their progress. The six top-scoring states are Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, New York, Oklahoma, and Utah. Each of these states has established an open data policy that requires basic government data, such as expenditure information, as well as other agency data, to be published on their open data portals in a machine-readable format. These portals contain extensive catalogs of open data, are relatively simple to navigate, and provide data in machine-readable formats as required. States creating new open data policies or portals, or refreshing old ones, have many opportunities to learn from the experiences of these early adopters in order to fully realize the benefits of data-driven innovation.

Center for Data Innovation Ranks States on Open Data Efforts

Sticky Data

The Globe and Mail
When conducted properly data de-identification can be a useful tool for protecting privacy, while enabling innovation.
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