Competitiveness

Innovation, including the diffusion of information technology throughout the economy, is key to boosting productivity, which in turn is at the heart of increasing living standards.

The Size and Shape of Online Piracy

September 17, 2013
David Price unveiled a new study that examines the size and scope of global Internet piracy at this event, as well as hosted remarks from leading experts in online piracy.

As ITIF has demonstrated, the Internet has been a key driver of global growth while also providing consumers with vastly more choice and convenience.  But it also has enabled the growth of piracy of digital content. Past research has shown that almost a quarter of global Internet traffic is attributable to copyright-infringing content, while online piracy costs the U.S. economy $22 billion annually. Read more »

The Big Idea: Is Technology Taking or Making Jobs?

Politico
A new report by ITIF argues the claim that increased productivity eliminates jobs is misguided speculation.

Assessing the True Size and Scope of Online Piracy

Collaboration a Must to Improve U.S. Economy

The Morning Sun
Unless Americans work together for what is best for all our citizens, the economy will continue to falter, and other nations will take advantage of our disarray.

Engineering 2.0: Rekindling American Ingenuity

September 11, 2013
Engineering is the “sine qua non” of technological innovation. Unfortunately, the U.S. is falling behind in the race for global innovation advantage in part because we are unable to efficiently translate research into competitively produced products.
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The STEM Crisis is Real

September 11, 2013
| Blogs & Op-eds

Recently, Robert Charette penned a blog post on IEEE Spectrum titled “The STEM Crisis is a Myth.” However, Mr. Charette’s argument is based on flawed analysis and faulty assumptions. America does face a STEM shortage in key industries and if we do not enact reforms to address this we will continue to fall behind our global competitors.

ITIF Debate: Is Technology Responsible for American Job Loss?

September 10, 2013

Since the Great Recession, a long list of books, studies, and news articles have attempted to assign the blame for America’s sustained high levels of unemployment to technology. These academics and journalists argue that factory automation, robots and faster and smarter computers are letting organizations replace workers at an unprecedented pace, leading to joblessness. Read more »

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Robots Are Not The Problem

Could a Fed Under Larry Summers Worsen America’s Investment Drought?

September 9, 2013
| Blogs & Op-eds

The question of who will replace outgoing Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke is important, not simply because the Fed plays a central role in monetary policy and banking system oversight, but because of policymakers’ reliance on the chair as a sage voice on broader economic policy.

Technology does not Eliminate Jobs, it Creates Them

September 9, 2013
| Blogs & Op-eds

Virtually all the scholarly economic research on the question of jobs and productivity finds that higher productivity does not lead to fewer jobs. Higher productivity makes products or services cheaper and consumers then are able to use those savings to buy other goods and services, helping create jobs. In many cases the cause of stagnant growth is too little, not too much, technology and automation, which makes industries less competitive in global markets, leading to job loss, less spending and investment, and a vicious cycle of stagnation.

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