Competitiveness

Innovation, including the diffusion of information technology throughout the economy, is key to boosting productivity, which in turn is at the heart of increasing living standards.

The Race to Innovate

October 6, 2009

The United States is losing ground quickly in the innovation sweepstakes to Japan, Denmark and other nations. There’s nothing mysterious about why: these and other nations have designed and funded federal policies to spur innovation, and we have not. The Fall, 2009 issue of Democracy: A Journal of Ideas features a symposium on “The Race to Innovate,” and examines what we should be doing in areas like finance, manufacturing, education, and creating new institutions that will help the private sector move forward. Read more »

Benchmarking Leading Countries’ National Innovation Policies

October 6, 2009

ITIF Senior Analyst Stephen Ezell presents findings from the report, "Benchmarking Leading Countries’ National Innovation Policies", appearing in September’s Democracy Journal benchmarking national innovation policies and analyzing what the United States can learn from the worlds’ ten most innovation-forward countries.

See video

Benchmarking Leading Countries’ National Innovation Policies

September 28, 2009 - 9:00am - 10:30am
ITIF
1101 K Street
suite 610
Washington, DC
20005

Please join ITIF on Monday, September 28, from 9:00-10:30am, for the event Benchmarking Leading Countries’ National Innovation Policies. Read more »

America and the World: We’re Number 40!

September 15, 2009
| Reports

ITIF Senior Analyst Stephen Ezell’s article, "America and the World: We’re Number 40!", in September’s Democracy Journal examines how the United States has lost its lead in developing innovation policies (and thus risks losing leadership in high-technology innovation), what other countries have done to capture this lead from the United States, and how we can get it back.

Structuring U.S. Innovation Policy: Creating a White House Office of Innovation Policy

June 24, 2009 - 9:00am - 10:30am
ITIF
1101 K Street
suite 610
Washington, DC
20005

Innovation is central to economic growth and to solving a host of pressing societal challenges. It is therefore critical to ensure that the federal agencies’ actions promote innovation, or at least pursue other social objectives in a manner that is least damaging to innovation. There is no formal process within the executive branch to ensure that this happens, however. Read more »

Structuring U.S. Innovation Policy: Creating a White House Office of Innovation Policy

June 24, 2009

In an ITIF report to be released, Duke Law School professors Stuart Benjamin and Arti Rai propose that the Obama administration (or Congress, if Congress is willing) create an Office of Innovation Policy that would draw upon, and feed into, existing regulatory review processes but would have the specific mission of being the “innovation champion” within these processes.

See video

Structuring U.S. Innovation Policy: Creating a White House Office of Innovation Policy

June 24, 2009
| Reports

Duke Law School professors Stuart Benjamin and Arti Rai propose that the Obama administration (or Congress, if Congress is willing) create an Office of Innovation Policy that would draw upon, and feed into, existing regulatory review processes but would have the specific mission of being the “innovation champion” within these processes.

Innovation is central to economic growth and to solving a host of pressing societal challenges. It is therefore critical to ensure that the federal agencies’ actions promote innovation, or at least pursue other social objectives in a manner that is least damaging to innovation. There is no formal process within the executive branch to ensure that this happens, however. In particular, the centralized cost-benefit review performed by OMB’s Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs generally ignores the impact of agency actions on innovation. A new Office of Innovation Policy would bridge the gap between the traditional business of government and creating innovative leadership within OMB’s review process.

Progress and Innovation: Can We Restore Faith in the Future?

April 30, 2009 - 9:00am - 10:30am
ITIF (Past Location)
1250 Eye Street, NW, Suite 200
2
Washington, DC
20005

Most civilizations have looked back to a golden age when things were better. In contrast, America has emphasized self-improvement aimed at a vague, but much better tomorrow. Are we reverting to the older view of time? One that resists innovation and the notion of progress? Or can a “frontier” mentality and America’s innovation leadership be restored? Read more »

Progress and Innovation: Can We Restore Faith in the Future?

April 30, 2009

Most civilizations have looked back to a golden age when things were better. In contrast, America has emphasized self-improvement aimed at a vague, but much better tomorrow. Are we reverting to the older view of time? One that resists innovation and the notion of progress? Or can a “frontier” mentality and America’s innovation leadership be restored?

During this event award-winning scientist and science fiction writer David Brin to explore the issue.

“Stim-Novation”: Investing in Research to Spur Innovation and Boost Jobs

March 4, 2009
| Reports

The ideal fiscal stimulus measure not only creates jobs and drives economic activity in the short run but also boosts quality of life and economic growth in the medium and long run. Support for scientific research in the stimulus package accomplishes both goals. In this report, ITIF finds that spurring an additional $20 billion investment in our national research infrastructure will create or retain approximately 402,000 American jobs for one year.

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