Competitiveness

Innovation, including the diffusion of information technology throughout the economy, is key to boosting productivity, which in turn is at the heart of increasing living standards.

Congress and Small Business Administrators should create a Young Entrepreneurial Fellowship Program.

The Young Entrepreneurial Fellowship program would be a modest Small Business Administration (SBA) program, with funding of $5 million per year, to support the living expenses of 25 young entrepreneurs for two years each. An outside panel of entrepreneurs would help SBA review proposals and business plans from applicants. The fellows would also receive mentoring and other technical assistance as they seek to build an ongoing business. If just one of the 25 fellows creates a successful enterprise, the program would likely pay for itself in job creation and increased tax revenue.

A Chinese Restaurant Menu Instead of Bumper Stickers

March 11, 2011
| Blogs & Op-eds

In this blog, Steve Norton says it is time to stop devising innovation based on bumper sticker phrases. What’s needed is Chinese menu approach. Take some ideas from Column A and some Ideas from column B and we can update tax, trade, regulatory and public R&D investments to line up with today’s realities. It took 30 years of well-intentioned but ultimately flawed policies from both Democrats and Republicans to get the U.S. into its current economic predicament. It is time to think anew and create a Column C – for cooperation and competitiveness.

U.S. Competitiveness: A New Conversation with New Opportunities

March 10, 2011 - 8:00am - 1:00pm
Union Station
50 Massachusetts Ave NE
Columbus Room
Washington
DC
20002

View the event agenda. Read more »

One from Column A, B, and C: Finding a New Bipartisan Consensus on U.S. Competitiveness and Innovation Policy

March 10, 2011
| Reports

A number of reports show that U.S. innovation-based competitiveness continues to slip against foreign competitors. Yet while both political parties and their ideologically affiliated special interest groups have offered their own sets of recommendations to restore competitiveness, the United States remains bogged down in partisan bickering, ideological rigidity, and an inability of each side to acknowledge the merits of the others’ proposals. But U.S. competitiveness can no longer be seen as a partisan issue. For the U.S. to restore its innovation-based competitiveness to a world-leading position, it will have to forge a new bipartisan consensus on U.S. competitiveness and innovation policies that blends the best ideas from left and right around four key policy areas: tax, trade, technology, and talent.

In essence, we need to choose the best policies from column “D” and column “R.” That is, selecting both from policies that Democrats would be more likely to favor and Republicans more likely to oppose, while also drawing from policy recommendations Republicans would be more likely to champion and Democrats more likely to resist. From the latter category, the United States must expand public investment in innovation, fully fund key innovation-supporting agencies (such as the PTO, FDA, and statistical agencies), fund STEM education, and support trade enforcement. But this is not sufficient, for the United States also needs to adopt more (traditionally conservative) policies from the latter category, including making the U.S. tax code much more efficient, harnessing the power of private enterprise rather than shackling it through excessive regulations, expanding trade agreements, and fostering high-skill immigration.

U.S. Competitiveness: A New Conversation with New Opportunities

March 10, 2011
Multimedia from the conference on how to boost productivity and competitiveness by advancing emerging growth sectors.

There is a growing sense of urgency for bipartisan commitment to restoring America's competitive edge through innovation. In that spirit, ITIF hosts a seminal half-day conference on how the United States can revitalize economic growth by boosting innovation and productivity in existing industries while also advancing emerging growth sectors such as nanotechnology, biotechnology and mobile broadband.

The Obama Administration's Innovation Policy

March 9, 2011 - 8:00am - 11:00am
Hamilton Crowne Plaza
1001 14th Street NW
Washington
DC
20005

View the event agenda. Read more »

The Obama Administration's Innovation Policy

March 9, 2011
Multimedia from the event.

In his 2011 State of Union Address, President Obama warned of a "Sputnik moment" in calling for the nation to confront our international economic competitiveness and innovation policy challenges. Read more »

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