Competitiveness

Innovation, including the diffusion of information technology throughout the economy, is key to boosting productivity, which in turn is at the heart of increasing living standards.

Lower-tier APEC economies should participate in discussion forums for continuous assessing and monitoring of the cutting-edge innovative regulatory tools that leader economies have explored.

Lower-tier economies should participate in discussion forums for continuous assessing and monitoring of the cutting-edge innovative regulatory tools and best practices that leader economies have explored in the hope of surmounting the challenges. They include: Reforming the ICT sector in an economy-specific framework of change management; Establishing a separate telecom/ICT regulator (among 21 APEC economies investigated, China, Hong Kong, Russia, and Vietnam have no separate entity for ICT regulation and policy); Extending telecom/ICT policy beyond the traditional core areas to include broadcasting content, Internet content, cybersecurity, and green IT policies for climate change; Setting clear dispute resolution mechanisms in a regulatory framework; and Aggressively reforming the spectrum allocation process more toward market-based allocation.

More Help Needed to Prepare Workers for Well-Paid, High-Quality Jobs

MarketWatch
Stephen Ezell outlines a strategy for revitalizing U.S. manufacturing, which suffered a precipitous decline during the past decade. Key to a reversal, he writes, will be greatly expanded government efforts to support the competitiveness of small- and medium-sized (SME) firms.

ITIF Welcomes Release of "The Competitiveness and Innovative Capacity of the United States" Report

ITIF President Rob Atkinson made the following statement on the U.S. Department of Commerce report, "The Competitiveness and Innovative Capacity of the United States," delivered today to Congress. Read more »

Rob Atkinson, President ITIF, Speaks About the COMPETES Report

January 5, 2012
As the Commerce Department unveiled a report on U.S. innovation and competitiveness, ITIF hoped it would raise the public awareness of ebbing of U.S. competitiveness.

As the Commerce Department unveiled a report on U.S. innovation and competitiveness, which ITIF had long championed, ITIF President Rob Atkinson said he hoped it would raise the public awareness of ebbing of U.S. competitiveness.

"I hope this is a first step in the process of Washington waking up to the urgent innovation challenge and giving it the same attention as the budget deficit. But we need to do more than merely wake up. We must bound out of our complacency and partisanship as if our future depends on it, because it does," he said. Read more »

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The Atlantic Century II: Benchmarking Asian, EU, and U.S. Innovation and Competitiveness

December 19, 2011
| Blogs & Op-eds

In this addition of Bridges, published by the Office of Science & Technology at the Austrian Embassy, Senior Analyst Stephen Ezell reflects on the current race for global innovation advantage. The last decade has seen an increasing realization by economists and policymakers alike that it is not so much the accumulation of more savings or capital but rather it is innovation - the improvement of existing or the creation of entirely new products, processes, services, and business or organizational models - that drives countries' long-run economic growth and improvements in standards of living. As a result, a fierce race for global innovation advantage has emerged, as countries compete intensely to realize the highest levels of innovation-based economic growth.

To advance their competitiveness in this race, many countries have implemented thoughtful and constructive national innovation policies aimed at boosting the ability of companies and organizations in their economy to become more productive and innovative. Other countries are trying to win the race by deploying innovation mercantilist practices that distort global trade by trying to redirect the location of innovation (e.g., research and development) and production (e.g., manufacturing) activity to their shores at the expense of other countries.

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Explaining Anemic U.S. Job Growth: The Role of Faltering U.S. Competitiveness

December 5, 2011 - 10:00am - 11:30am
Information Technology and Innovation Foundation
1101 K Street NW
Suite 610A
Washington
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20005

The Great Recession officially ended more than two years ago but the recovery is barely perceptible and anxious policymakers are running out of options. Washington cannot seem to agree on what caused the Recession in the first place or how to create robust job growth. One camp argues for revving up consumer demand through fiscal and monetary policy. Read more »

APEC economies now represent approximately 54 percent of world GDP and 44 percent of world trade.

Economically, the Asia Pacific region is a vibrant and complex place. The policies of individual countries and their relationships with one another will have a huge influence on the United States' economic future and impact the entire globe. Within the 21-member Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation bloc, innovation policies vary. It is critical to encourage the widespread adoption of pro-growth policies and respect for the rules-based trading system within APEC.

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