Broadband

ITIF Comments to the FCC on the Petition for Declaratory Ruling Regarding Internet Management Policies

February 13, 2008
| Testimony and Filings

ITIF recently submitted comments to the FCC on the Petition for Declaratory Ruling Regarding Internet Management Policies. In its commentary, ITIF states that universal access to broadband is an important goal and that users have the right to access lawful Internet content. Yet, even with aggressive deployment of higher speed networks, bandwidth will continue to be scarce for the foreseeable future. As a result, ISPs should have the right to reasonably manage their networks to ensure a fair and efficient distribution of bandwidth among their subscribers.

As long as ISPs’ network management policies are transparent, fair, and their express purpose is to address the impact of certain data-intensive traffic on the network, they are in accordance with the FCC’s Internet access principles. The notion that broadband networks are in some way fundamentally different than other networks and should deal with capacity limitations only through network expansion is not supported by either logic or the long evidence from other network infrastructures.

Framing a National Broadband Policy

January 22, 2008 - 9:00am - 10:30am
The Information Technology and Innovation Foundation
1250 Eye Street, NW, Suite 200
Room 2
Washington, DC
20005

The broadband debate over the past year has focused largely on the fact that the United States has fallen behind other nations in broadband penetration. But the real issue is deciding what kind of proactive broadband policies the United States should implement. Read more »

Framing a National Broadband Policy

January 22, 2008
An event marking the publication of an ITIF report articulating a national broadband strategy. ITIF President Rob Atkinson will present proposals from the report.

The broadband debate over the past year has focused largely on the fact that the United States has fallen behind other nations in broadband penetration. But the real issue is deciding what kind of proactive broadband policies the United States should implement. Read more »

Framing a National Broadband Policy

January 18, 2008
| Reports

This article appeared in the Fall 2007 issue of Commlaw Conspectus, a telecommunications law journal.

It is difficult to pick up a business or technology magazine without reading that the United States is falling behind other nations in broadband telecommunications. The real question is not whether the United States is falling behind-it is, as will be demonstrated-but whether the country should have a national broadband policy in response and, if so, what it should look like.

The answer to this question is not obvious. After all, a host of other exciting digital technologies have recently been introduced, and there is no talk of an Xbox gap or a national MP3 player strategy. On the other hand, broadband is unique in that the social returns of broadband investment exceed the private returns to companies and consumers. Therefore, market forces alone will not generate the societally optimal level of broadband in the foreseeable future.

Part II of this article assesses how far and why the United States has fallen behind in broadband. Part III then discusses why leaving broadband to the market alone will likely lead to adoption of broadband at a less than societally optimal rate. These reasons, laid out in Part IV, are: (1) network externalities; (2) “prosumer” investment externalities; (3) competitiveness externalities; and (4) regional externalities. Part V considers the trade-offs between various broadband goals, including universal deployment to all places, universal take-up by all individuals, faster broadband speeds, and increased competition. Fi-nally, Part VI concludes that the reasons discussed necessitate a national broadband policy, and suggests that crafting such a policy must involve sig-nificant analysis, debate, and consideration.

Mind the Gap: Benchmarking Digital Inclusion in America

December 10, 2007
| Presentations

Benchmarking Digital Inclusion, a presentation by ITIF President Rob Atkinson to the Digital Inclusion Forum on December 10, 2007.

Don't Shoot the Messenger: Telecommunications Carriers Deserve Immunity

November 7, 2007
| Reports

ITIF has released a paper on proposed legislation to overhaul the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) and, in particular, on proposals to deny immunity to telecommunications carriers that complied with the federal government's surveillance program post 9/11. The paper makes two key points. First, the Bush Administration was wrong in not working with Congress from the beginning in implementing its post-9/11 emergency surveillance program. Second, the focus of Congress' efforts should be on updating FISA, not on holding telecommunications carriers legally liable for complying with what they believed was a legal government order.

The Importance of National Policies to Connect Rural America to Broadband

October 23, 2007
| Testimony and Filings

ITIF Senior Analyst Julie Hedlund’s testimony on U.S. programs and legislation to support rural broadband access for the House Appropriations Agriculture Subcommittee.

The Road to Next-Generation Broadband

October 22, 2007
| Reports

ITIF Research Analyst Daniel Correa’s article in the forthcoming issue of IEEE Internet Computing Journal that documents how other nations have more robust broadband than the United States and offers a framework for thinking about broadband policy to accelerate America down the path to next-generation broadband.

Building the Broadband Economy and Society

October 19, 2007 - 9:00am - 1:30pm
Hyatt Regency Washington
400 New Jersey Avenue, NW
Thornton Room
Washington, DC
20005

Ubiquitous deployment of high speed broadband services promises a host of economic and social benefits. Read more »

Pro-taxes or pro-Internet?

October 17, 2007
| Blogs & Op-eds

Rep. Anna Eshoo (D-CA), Rob Atkinson (ITIF), and James Gattuso (Heritage Foundation) argue for the need to make permanent the ban on Internet access taxes in The Hill.

Syndicate content